Proceedings, American Philosophical Society (vol. 95, no. 3)

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American Philosophical Society
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Page 229 - A sermon on the present situation of American affairs, preached in Christ Church, June 23, 1775, at the request of the Officers of the Third Battalion of the city of Philadelphia and District of Southwark.
Page 254 - The author, with the aid of a grant from the Penrose Fund of the American Philosophical Society, is trying to locate, identify, and catalog all extant versions, such as those that appear here. The magnificent "Young Omahaw, War Eagle, Little Missouri, and Pawnees...
Page 242 - Considering our well-furnished, plentiful market as the best of gardens, I am turning mine, in the midst of which my house stands, into grass plots and gravel walks, with trees and flowering shrubs.
Page 253 - The last of the above officers has accepted of the new office of inspectorgeneral of our army, in order to reform abuses ; but the remedy is only a palliative one. In one of his letters to a friend he says, ' A great and good God hath decreed America to be free, or the [General] and weak counsellors would have ruined her long ago.
Page 223 - The American Society for promoting and propagating Useful Knowledge, held in Philadelphia (1766-1768).
Page 253 - Dear Sir; The common danger of our country first brought you and me together. I recollect with pleasure the influence of your conversation and eloquence upon the opinions of this country in the beginning of the present controversy. You first taught us to shake off our idolatrous attachment to royalty, and to oppose its encroachments upon our liberties, with our very lives. By these means you saved us from ruin. The independence of America is the offspring of that liberal spirit of thinking and acting,...
Page 215 - Oswald was empowered to treat " with any commissioners or persons, vested with equal powers by and on the part of the Thirteen United States of America.
Page 253 - ... common danger of our country first brought you and me together. I recollect with pleasure the influence of your conversation and eloquence upon the opinions of this country in the beginning of the present controversy. You first taught us to shake off our idolatrous attachment to royalty, and to oppose its encroachments upon our liberties with our very lives. By these means you saved us from ruin. The independence of America is the offspring of that liberal spirit of thinking, and acting, which...
Page 271 - Be it remembered, In honor of the Philadelphia Youth, (Then chiefly artificers,) That, in MDCCXXXI, They cheerfully At the Instance of Benjamin Franklin, One of their Number, Instituted the Philadelphia Library, Which, though small at first, Is become highly valuable, and extensively useful. And which the Walls of this Edifice Are now destined to contain and preserve; The first Stone of whose Foundation Was here placed The 31st of August, MDCCLXXXIX.
Page 306 - I arose, and, as I attempted to step over the threshold of my door, I stumbled and should have fallen had they not caught me. They were three holy men who looked alike, and were dressed alike. The paint they wore seemed but one day old. Each held in his hand a shrub bearing different kinds of fruit. One of them, addressing me, said, " We have come to comfort and relieve you. Take of these berries and eat; they will restore you to health.

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