Uruguay, Issue 61

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1892 - Tariff - 347 pages
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User Review  - juniperSun - LibraryThing

One of the hardest books I have ever read. LaDuke does not hesitate to rub our noses in the abuses perpetrated by European invaders over the last several centuries. I had hoped for more positive ... Read full review

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Page 16 - Congress, consisting of two Chambers; the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies.
Page 76 - Table showing entrances and clearances in 1891 from foreign countries at Montevideo. Of the vessels arrived in 1891 there came in ballast 15 steamers of 14,355 tons register and 12 sailing vessels of 5,876 tons, and 43 sailing vessels of 22,752 tons register made no operation in this port, proceeding with all their cargo up the River Plate. Of the clearances of 1891 there left in ballast 41 steamers of 26,690 tons register and 176 sailing vessels of 147,169 tons. Table showing the coast and river...
Page 77 - Republic there arrived in 1891, 9,637 vessels (5,180 steamers and 4,457 sailing vessels) of a registered tonnage of 2,009,951 tons, of which, however, nearly three-fourths was in ballast. The proportion of vessels coming from foreign ports contained in the above figures can not now be obtained. Entered. Oared. Flag. No. Tons. No. Ton*. 3.674 7,644 •94.078 1,851,719 3,57╗ 7.5S4 "91.994 1.8*6,563 Class of vessels.
Page 77 - ... vessels of 22,752 tons register made no operation in this port, proceeding with all their cargo up the River Plate. Of the clearances of 1891 there left in ballast 41 steamers of 26,690 tons register and 176 sailing vessels of 147,169 tons. Table showing the coast and river trade of Montevideo in 1891. Of these, 102 steamers of 31,254 tons and 171 sailing vessels of 8,346 tons entered in ballast, and 72 steamers of 22,461 tons and 519 sailing vessels of 42,507 tons cleared in ballast. At all...
Page 7 - Uruguay at that time were divided into two powerful tribes or nations — the Charruas and the Yaros. It was to a band of the former that the great navigator Solis fell a victim.
Page 8 - Ramon, to explore the country along the Uruguay, but the band was attacked by the Charruas, and its leader killed, with many of his followers. Cabot himself ascended the Plata...

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