Interpretive Conventions: The Reader in the Study of American Fiction

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Cornell University Press, 1984 - American fiction - 228 pages
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In Interpretive Conventions, Steven Mailloux provides a general introduction to reader-response criticism while developing his own specific reader-oriented approach to literature. He examines five influential theories of the reading process--those of Stanley Fish, Jonathan Culler, Wolfgang Iser, Norman Holland, and David Bleich. He goes on to argue the need for a more comprehensive reader-response criticism based on a consistent social model of reading. He develops such a reading model and also discusses American textual editing and literary history.

 

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Contents

Preface
9
Acknowledgments
15
Literary Theory and Social Reading Models
40
The Reader in American Fiction
66
Textual Scholarship and Authors Final Intention
95
A Typology of Conventions
126
Interpretive Conventions
140
Literary History and Reception Study
159
Reading the Reader
192
ReaderResponse Criticism and Teaching
208
Bibliographical Note
217
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

Steven Mailloux is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of Rhetorical Power and Reception Histories: Rhetoric, Pragmatism, and American Cultural Politics, both published by Cornell University Press.

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