In Times Like These, by Nellie L. McClung

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D. Appleton, 1915 - Women - 217 pages
 

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Page 114 - From too much love of living, From hope and fear set free, We thank with brief thanksgiving Whatever gods may be, That no life lives forever; That dead men rise up never; That even the weariest river Winds somewhere safe to sea.
Page 67 - Not only live, but live peaceably ! If a husband and wife are going to quarrel they will find a cause for dispute easily enough, and will not be compelled to wait for election day. And supposing that they have never, never had a single dispute, and not a ripple has ever marred the placid surface of their matrimonial sea, I believe that a small family jar — or at least a real lively argument — will do them good. It is in order to keep the white-winged angel of peace hovering over the home that...
Page 115 - And now I say unto you ; Refrain from these men, and let them alone ; for if this counsel or this work, be of men, it will come to nought; but if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it, lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Page 22 - How often would I have gathered you, as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, but ye would not...
Page 102 - HEART TO HEART TALK WITH THE WOMEN OF THE CHURCH BY THE GOVERNING BODIES Go, labor on, good sister Anne, Abundant may thy labors be; To magnify thy brother man Is all the Lord requires of thee! Go, raise the mortgage, year by year, And joyously thy way pursue, And when you get the title clear, We'll move a vote of thanks to you! Go, labor on, the night draws nigh; Go, build us churches — as you can. The times are hard, but chicken-pie Will do the trick. Oh, rustle, Anne! Go, labor on, good sister...
Page 66 - Women have cleaned up things since time began; and if women ever get into politics there will be a cleaning-out of pigeon-holes and forgotten corners, on which the dust of years has fallen, and the sound of the political carpet-beater will be heard in the land.
Page 74 - ... other people sleep — poor women who leave the sacred precincts of home to earn enough to keep the breath of life in them, who carry their scrub-pails home, through the deserted streets, long after the cars have stopped running. They are exposed to cold, to hunger, to insult — poor souls — is there any pity felt for them? Not that we have heard of. The tender-hearted ones can bear this with equanimity. It is the thought of women getting into comfortable and well-paid positions which wrings...
Page 65 - Now politics simply means public affairs — yours and mine, everybody's — and to say that politics are too corrupt for women is a weak and foolish statement for any man to make. Any man who is actively engaged in politics, and declares that politics are too corrupt for women, admits one of two things, either that he is a party to this corruption, or that he is unable to prevent it — and in either case something should be done.
Page 73 - Sitting up on a pedestal does not appeal very strongly to a healthy woman — and, besides, if a woman has been on a pedestal for any length of time, it must be very hard to have to come down and cut the wood. These tender-hearted and chivalrous gentlemen who tell you of their adoration for women, cannot bear to think of women occupying public positions. Their tender hearts shrink from the idea of women lawyers or women policemen, or even women preachers; these positions would 'rub the bloom off...
Page 25 - If it be true that the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world, how comes the liquor traffic and the white slave traffic to prevail among us unchecked? Do women wish for these things ? Do the gentle mothers whose hands rule the world declare in favor of these things?" Every day the number of doubters has increased, and now women everywhere realize that a bad old lie has been put over on them for years. The hand that rocks the cradle does not rule the world. If it did, human life would be held...

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