Derry and Enniskillen in the Year 1689: The Story of Some Famous Battlefields in Ulster

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W. Mullan, 1873 - Derry (Northern Ireland) - 368 pages
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Page 324 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more, Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility ; But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger...
Page 354 - The Commission. To all Christian people to whom these presents shall come, know ye, that we, the...
Page 361 - Majesties, William and Mary, King and Queen of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, Defenders of the Faith, and by order of their said Majesties...
Page 26 - I have written to you to let you know that all our Irishmen through Ireland is sworn ; that on the ninth day of this month they are all to fall on to kill and murder man, wife, and child ; and I desire your lordship to take care of yourself, and all others that are judged by our men to be heads, for whosoever of...
Page 245 - God's province, and that it ought not to be imposed on; and his experience in Holland made him look on toleration as one of the wisest measures of government: he was much troubled to see so much ill humour spreading among the clergy, and by their means over a great part of the nation.
Page 94 - Londonderry, for the present garrison, and the two regiments on board, for above a week, or ten days at most, and it appearing that the place is not tenable against a well appointed army: therefore it is concluded upon, and resolved...
Page 342 - Leighton of what he was entrusted to represent to us, in relation to the condition of the Protestants in Ireland', we have directed him to assure you in our name, how sensibly we are affected with the hazards you are exposed to, by the illegal power the Papists have of late usurped in that kingdom, and that we are resolved to employ the most speedy and effectual means in our power, to rescue you from the oppressions and terrors you lie under...
Page 94 - Foyle ; that, considering the present circumstance of affairs, and the likelihood the enemy will soon possess themselves of this place, it is thought most convenient that the principal officers shall privately withdraw themselves, as well for their own preservation as in hopes that the inhabitants, by a timely capitulation, may make terms the better with the enemy; and that this we judge most convenient for his Majesty's service, as the present state of affairs now is."* * Walker, April 17.
Page 361 - The humble Address of the Governors, Officers, Clergy, and other Gentlemen, in the City and Garrison of Londonderry.
Page 158 - Lord kept the city, and none else ; for there were many of us that could hardly stand on our feet before the enemy attacked the walls, who, when they were assaulting the out-trenches, ran out against them most nimbly and with great courage. Indeed, it was never the poor, starved men that were in...

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