Corpus Linguistics: Investigating Language Structure and Use

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 23, 1998 - Computers - 300 pages
3 Reviews
This book is about investigating the way people use language in speech and writing. It introduces the corpus-based approach to the study of language, based on analysis of large databases of real language examples and illustrates exciting new findings about language and the different ways that people speak and write. The book is important both for its step-by-step descriptions of research methods and for its findings about grammar and vocabulary, language use, language learning, and differences in language use across texts and user groups.
 

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Contents

Lexicography
21
Grammar
55
Lexicogrammar
84
The study of discourse characteristics
106
Investigating the characteristics of varieties
133
Register variation and English for Specific Purposes
135
Language acquisition and development
172
Historical and stylistic investigations
203
3 Concordancing packages versus programming for corpus analysis
254
4 Characteristics of tagged corpora
257
5 The process of tagging
261
6 Norming frequency counts
263
7 Statistical measures of lexical associations
265
8 The unit of analysis in corpusbased studies
269
9 Significance tests and the reporting of statistics
275
10 Factor loadings and dimension scores
278

Summing up and looking ahead
231
Conclusion
233
Methodology boxes
243
1 Issues in corpus design
246
2 Issues in diachronic corpus design
251
commercially available corpora and analytical tools
281
References
288
Index
297
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Page iv - Cambridge Approaches to Linguistics General editor: Jean Aitchison, Rupert Murdoch Professor of Language and Communication, University of Oxford In the past twenty-five years, linguistics - the systematic study of language - has expanded dramatically. Its findings are now of interest to psychologists, sociologists, philosophers, anthropologists, teachers, speech therapists and numerous others who have realized that language is of crucial importance in their life and work. But when newcomers try to...
Page 4 - ... corpus," as the basis for analysis; • it makes extensive use of computers for analysis, using both automatic and interactive techniques; • it depends on both quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques.

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