A Handbook of Greek Constitutional History

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Dec 1, 2005 - History - 296 pages
The democratic principle in its extreme form is the assertation that the mere fact of free birth is alone sufficient to constitute a claim to all offices. It is never the claim of a majority to rule, but it is the demand that every one, whether rich or poor, high- or low-born, shall be equally represented in the constitution. This is what Aristotle calls the principle of numerical equality.-from "Chapter VI: Democracy"One of the most renowned classical scholars of the turn of the 20th century here offers a lucid and highly readable overview of a difficult and little understood aspect of Greek history: its public law, not just how it was structured but how it behaved in action. This 1896 book-perfect for university students, amateur historians, and readers of the history of the law-covers the full range of Greek legal development, from the origin of the city-state and the beginnings of the Greek monarchy to the social and political institutions of the far-flung Greek civilization to the rise of federalism and its long-term historical impact on the cultures that came after.British classical scholar A.H.J. GREENIDGE was a lecturer in ancient history at Brasenose College, Oxford. He is also the author of Roman Public and Private Law (1894), Legal Procedure in Cicero's Time (1901), and Roman Public Life (1901), among many other works of ancient history.
 

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Contents

The references are to the pages
1
Meaning of rhetra 92 Constitution of Lyeurgus 93 Rhetra
2
Earlj movements towards reform the constitution of Draco 149
3
CHAPTER II
12
CHAPTER III
36
International
45
CLASSIFICATION OF CONSTITUTIONS OLIGARCHY
56
Conception of oligarchy 60 Instability of this form of government
71
CHAPTER VI
122
Decline of the monarchy and early history of the arehonship 135 The
139
Tub Athenian Empire
189
Origin of the second Athenian confederacy 204 Conditions of
207
What constitutes a federal government 220 Fenerations of cities
225
system of Arcadia 229 Federalism becomes the normal type of polity
232
union dissolution revival and extension of the league 231 Con
243
political civilisation replaces Greek in Southern Italy and Sicily 250
251

Spartas position in Laeonia 78 Origin of the Perioeci 78 Ethnic ele
88

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Page 4 - subordinated the individual to the state,' is only a fiction in the sense that it was a theory which did not always square with the facts of political life. As a genuine theory, the realisation of which was consistently pursued by philosophers if not by legislators, it runs through the whole of Greek political thought.
Page 10 - Timarch. the product of a government ; he only faintly appealed to the gods, and, while giving law a divine character, rarely in the historical period gave it a directly divine origin. The charge that Greek law lacked an authoritative character is therefore not unnatural ; but it is wrongly stated when it is implied that the Greek looked on his state as an "oracle of spiritual truth," as a " parochial Sinai," as a Pope who could not be

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