The Cambridge Companion to the Cello

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Robin Stowell
Cambridge University Press, Jun 28, 1999 - Music - 269 pages
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This is a compact, composite and authoritative survey of the history and development of the cello and its repertory since the origins of the instrument. The volume comprises thirteen essays, written by a team of nine distinguished scholars and performers, and is intended to develop the cello's historical perspective in breadth and from every relevant angle, offering as comprehensive a coverage as possible. It focuses in particular on four principal areas: the instrument's structure, development and fundamental acoustical principles; the careers of the most distinguished cellists since the baroque era; the cello repertory (including chapters devoted to the concerto, the sonata, other solo repertory, and ensemble music); and its technique, teaching methods and relevant aspects of historical and performance practice. It is the most comprehensive book ever to be published about the instrument and provides essential information for performers, students and teachers.
 

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Contents

The cello origins and evolution
1
The bow its history and development
28
Cello acoustics
37
Masters of the Baroque and Classical eras
52
Nineteenthcentury virtuosi
61
Masters of the twentieth century
73
The concerto
92
The sonata
116
Technique style and performing practice to c 1900
178
The development of cello teaching in the twentieth century
195
The frontiers of technique
211
Principal pedagogical literature
224
Glossary of technical terms
229
Notes
236
Select Bibliography
246
Index
253

Other solo repertory
137
Ensemble music in the chamber and the orchestra
160

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