Southern History of the War: Official Reports of Battles, Volume 1

Front Cover
C.B. Richardson, 1864 - Confederate States of America - 578 pages
0 Reviews

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 113 - SIR: — The distribution of the forces under my command, incident to an unexpected change of commanders, and the overwhelming force under your command, compel me, notwithstanding the brilliant success of the Confederate arms yesterday, to accept the ungenerous and unchivalrous terms which you propose.
Page 112 - SIR: Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of Commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.
Page 19 - Manassas, where they had arrived by railroad at noon. Directed in person by General Johnston to the left, then so much endangered, on reaching a position in rear of the oak woods, south of the Henry house, and immediately east of the Sudley road.
Page 214 - PM, the lines in advance, which had repulsed the enemy in their last fierce assault on our left and centre, received the orders to retire; this was done with uncommon steadiness, and the enemy made no attempt to follow. The line of troops established to cover this movement had been disposed on a favorable ridge commanding the ground of Shiloh Church ; from this position our artillery played upon the woods beyond for a while, but upon no visible enemy and without reply.
Page 213 - ... of which our country may be proudly hopeful. Again and again our troops were brought to the charge, invariably to win the position at issue, invariably to drive back their foe.
Page 115 - Impressed with the great deficiency in the preparations for defending the passage of the river at Fort Henry, the commanding officer expressed to me his fears that it might cause disaster if the place were vigorously attacked by the enemy's gunboats. This he thought his greatest danger. In conjunction with General...
Page 266 - Without ammunition, and with only their bayonets to rely on, steadily my men advanced, under a heavy fire from light batteries, siege-pieces, and gunboats. Passing through the ravine, they arrived near the crest of the opposite hill, upon which the enemy's batteries were, but could not be urged further without support. Sheltering themselves against the precipitous sides of the ravine, they remained under this fire for some time.
Page 12 - Against this odds, scarcely credible, our advance position was still for a while maintained, and the enemy's ranks constantly broken and shattered under the scorching fire of our men ; but fresh regiments of the Federalists came upon the field — Sherman's and Keyes...
Page 12 - Georgia regiment had suffered heavily, being exposed, as it took and maintained its position, to a fire from the enemy, already posted within a hundred yards of their front and right, sheltered by fences and other cover. It was at this time that Lieut.-col.
Page 18 - I gave the order for the right of my line, except my reserves, to advance to recover the plateau. It was done with uncommon resolution and vigor, and at the same time Jackson's brigade pierced the enemy's centre with the determination of veterans, and the spirit of men who fight for a sacred cause ; but it suffered seriously.

Bibliographic information