The universal receipt book: being a compendious repository of practical information in cookery, preserving, pickling, distilling, and all the branches of domestic economy. To which is added, some advice to farmers

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Published by Isaac Riley., 1818 - Cookery, American - 378 pages
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Page 4 - Congress of the United States entitled, " An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned." And also to the act, entitled, "An act supplementary to an act entitled " An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof...
Page 4 - BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the second day of December, in the fifty-third year of the Independence of the United States of America, SIMEON IDE, of the said District, hath deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " Inductive Grammar, designed for beginners.
Page 304 - When dung is to be preserved for any time, the situation in which it is kept is of importance. It should, if possible, be defended from the sun. To preserve it under sheds would be of great use; or to make the site of a dunghill on the north side of a wall. The floor on which the dung is heaped, should, if possible, be paved with flat stones; and there should be a little inclination from each side towards the centre, in which there should be drains connected with a small well, furnished with a pump,...
Page 304 - ... defended from the sun. To preserve it under sheds would be of great use; or to make the site of a dunghill on the north side of a wall. The floor on which the dung is heaped, should, if possible, be paved with flat stones; and there should be a little inclination from each side towards the centre, in which there should be drains connected with a small well, furnished with a pump, by which any fluid matter may be collected for the use of the land. It too often happens that a dense mucilaginous...
Page 302 - ... the surface late in autumn, and during winter. Again, it is a general principle in chemistry, that in all cases of decomposition, substances combine much more readily at the moment of their disengagement, than after they have been perfectly formed. And in fermentation beneath the soil, the fluid matter produced is applied instantly, even whilst it is warm, to the organs of the plant, and consequently is more likely to be efficient than in manure that has gone through the process, and of which...
Page 295 - ... manure. The decomposition slowly proceeds beneath * the soil; the soluble matters are gradually dissolved. and the slight fermentation that goes on checked by the want of a free communication of air, tends to render the woody fibre soluble without occasioning the rapid dissipation of elastic matter.
Page 302 - ... his manure goes nearly twice as far. A great objection against slightly fermented dung is, that weeds spring up more luxuriantly where it is applied. If there are seeds carried out in the dung, they certainly will germinate ; but it is seldom that this can be the case to any extent ; and if the land is not cleansed of weeds, any kind of manure fermented or unfermented will occasion their rapid growth. If slightly fermented farmyard dung is used as a top-dressing for pastures, the long straws...
Page 303 - The surface should be defended as much as possible from the oxygen of the atmosphere; a compact marl, or a tenacious clay, offers the best protection against the air; and before the dung is covered over, or, as it were, sealed up, it should be dried as much as possible. If the dung is found at any time to heat strongly, it should be turned over and cooled by exposure to air.
Page 297 - ... mixed with the soil. It is usual to carry straw that can be employed for no other purpose to the dunghill, to ferment, and decompose; but it is worth experiment, whether it may not be more economically applied when chopped small by a proper machine, and kept dry till it is ploughed in for the use of a crop. In this case, though it would decompose much more slowly and produce less effect at first, yet its influence would be much more lasting. Mere woody fibre seems to be the only vegetable matter...
Page 338 - Then go round again, with the like sweeping stroke downwards, always commencing each successive course a little higher than the upper stroke had extended, till the bottom be finished. This operation, if carefully performed, will frequently make very old paper look almost equal to new. Great caution must be used not by any means to rub the paper hard, nor to attempt cleaning it the cross, or horizontal way.

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