History and present condition of the newspaper and periodical press of the United States, with a catalogue of the publications of the census year, by S.N.D. North (Google eBook)

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1884
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Page 25 - In all prosecutions or indictments for libel, the truth may be given in evidence to the jury ; and if it shall appear to the jury that the matter charged as libellous is true, and was published with good motives and for justifiable ends, the party shall be acquitted ; and the jury shall have the right to determine the law and the fact.
Page 24 - In prosecutions for the publication of papers, investigating the official conduct of officers, or men in a public capacity, or where the matter published is proper for public information, the truth thereof may be given in evidence ; and, in all indictments for libels, the jury shall have a right to determine the law and the facts, under the direction of the court, as in other cases.
Page 25 - Every person may freely speak, write and publish on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse of that liberty; and in all trials for libel, both civil and criminal, the truth when published with good motives and for justifiable ends, shall be a sufficient defense.
Page 25 - That the freedom of the press is one of the great bulwarks of liberty, and can never be restrained but by despotic governments.
Page 160 - It must be originated and published for the dissemination of information of a public character, or devoted to literature, the sciences, arts, or some special industry...
Page 24 - That the printing presses shall be free to every person who undertakes to examine the proceedings of the legislature or any branch of government; and no law shall ever be made to restrain the right thereof. The free communication of thoughts and opinions is one of the invaluable rights of man: and every citizen may freely speak, write, and print on any subject, being responsible for the abuse of that liberty.
Page 33 - ... any false, scandalous and malicious writing or writings against the government of the United States or either house of the Congress of the United States or the President of the United States, with intent to defame the said government or either house of the said Congress or the said President, or to bring them or either of them into contempt or disrepute, or to excite against them, or either or any of them, the hatred of the good people of the United States...
Page 8 - Philadelphia the printers were indeed stationers; they sold only paper, etc.. almanacs, ballads, and a few common schoolbooks. Those who loved reading were obliged to send for their books from England. The members of the Junto had each a few.
Page 160 - First. It must regularly be issued at stated intervals, as frequently as four times a year, and bear a date of issue, and be numbered consecutively. "Second. It must be issued from a known office of publication. "Third. It must be formed of printed paper sheets, without board, cloth. leather, or other substantial binding, such as distinguish printed books for preservation from periodical publications. "Fourth. It must be originated and published for the dissemination of information of a public character...
Page 142 - There is doubtless no respectable portion of our countrymen who can be so far misled as to feel any other sentiment than that of indignant regret at conduct so destructive of the harmony and peace of the country, and so repugnant to the principles of our national compact and to the dictates of humanity and religion.

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