The Parliamentary Debates from the Year 1803 to the Present Time, Volume 28

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Page cxxxix - An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown, and better securing the Rights and Liberties of the Subject...
Page 385 - That an humble Address be presented to his Royal Highness the Prince Regent, That he will be graciously pleased to give directions, that there be laid before this House copies...
Page 173 - Ireland, and his Allies on the one part, and His Majesty the King of France and Navarre on the other part, animated by an equal desire to terminate the long agitations of Europe, and the sufferings of Mankind...
Page cxxxix - James, and since his decease, pretending to be and taking upon himself the stile and title of King of England by the name of James the Third, or of Scotland by the name of James the Eighth, or the stile and title of King of Great Britain, hath not any right or title whatsoever to the crown of this realm...
Page clxxxix - To continue, until six weeks after the commencement of the next session of parliament...
Page clxxxix - One thousand eight hundred and thirty-two ; to permit such Persons in Great Britain as have omitted to make and file Affidavits of the Execution of Indentures of Clerks to Attornies and...
Page 205 - And whereas the Senate of the United States have approved of the said arrangement and recommended that it should be carried into effect, the same having also received the sanction of His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, acting in the name and on the behalf of His...
Page 717 - Bounty (that is, the governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the Poor Clergy).
Page 197 - Traffic repugnant to the principles of natural justice and of the enlightened age in which we live, engages to unite all his efforts to those of His Britannic Majesty, at the approaching Congress, to induce all the Powers of Christendom to decree the abolition of the Slave Trade...
Page cxix - The judgment of penance for standing mute was as follows : — that the prisoner be remanded to the prison from whence he came, and put into a low, dark chamber, and there be laid on his back, on the bare floor, naked, unless where decency forbids ; that there be placed upon his body as great a weight of iron as...

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