Rilla of Ingleside

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Frederick A. Stokes, 1921 - Children's literature - 370 pages
Fifteen-year-old Rilla, the daughter of Anne Shirley Blythe, grows from a carefree, irresponsible girl into a strong and capable young woman during the war years, 1914-1918.
 

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I have read this book many times, and it is one of my favorite books. I think Lucy Maud Montgomery is a very good author.

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It's perfect I love this book I read it many times It is one of my favorite books

Contents

I
1
II
15
III
22
IV
37
V
53
VI
70
VII
80
VIII
91
XIX
221
XX
231
XXI
238
XXII
245
XXIII
254
XXIV
261
XXV
273
XXVI
283

IX
101
X
108
XI
122
XII
135
XIII
143
XIV
155
XV
164
XVI
173
XVII
189
XVIII
205
XXVII
296
XXVIII
314
XXIX
320
XXX
326
XXXI
332
XXXII
345
XXXIII
355
XXXIV
358
XXXV
363
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Page 331 - We've all given something to keep you flying," she said. "Four hundred thousand of our boys gone overseas — fifty thousand of them killed. But — you are worth it!" The wind whipped her grey hair about her face and the gingham apron that shrouded her from head to foot was cut on lines of economy, not of grace; yet, somehow, just then Susan made an imposing figure. She was one of the women — courageous, unquailing, patient, heroic — who had made victory possible. In her, they all saluted the...
Page 276 - And Jacob their father said unto them, Me have ye bereaved of my children: Joseph is not, and Simeon is not, and ye will take Benjamin away: all these things are against me.
Page 68 - Parson here's got something of the same idea," chuckled Norman. " Haven't you, Parson ? That's why you preached 'tother night on the text ' Without shedding of blood there is no remission of sins'.
Page 45 - I'm sure it doesn't concern us." Walter looked at her and had one of his odd visitations of prophecy. " Before this war is over," he said — or something said through his lips — " every man and woman and child in Canada will feel it — you, Mary, will feel it — feel it to your heart's core. You will weep tears of blood over it. The Piper has come — and he will pipe until every corner of the world has heard his awful and irresistible music. It will be years before the dance of death is over...
Page 259 - I've a premonition about you, Rilla, as well as about myself. I think Ken will go back to you — and that there are long years of happiness for you by-and-by. And you will tell your children of the Idea we fought and died for — teach them it must be lived for as well as died for, else the price paid for it will have been given for nought. This will be part of your work, Rilla. And if you — all you girls back in the homeland — do it, then we who don't come back will know that you have not 'broken...
Page 172 - Walter said lightly, having said all his serious things the night before in Rainbow Valley. But at the last moment he took her face between his hands and looked deep into her gallant eyes. " God bless you, Rilla-wty-Rilla,
Page 259 - gone west.' I've a premonition about you, Rilla, as well as about myself. I think Ken will go back to you — and that there are long years of happiness for you by-and-by.
Page 67 - She had her little store of homely philosophies to guide her through life, but she had nothing to buckler her against the thunderbolts of the week that had just passed. What had an honest, hard-working, Presbyterian old maid of Glen St. Mary to do with a war thousands of miles away ? Susan felt that it was indecent that she should have to be disturbed by it.
Page 208 - They belonged to another world altogether. Life has been cut in two by the chasm of the war. What is ahead I don't know — but it can't be a bit like the past. I wonder if those of us who have lived half our lives in the old world will ever feel wholly at home in the new.
Page 258 - I'm glad I came, Rilla. It isn't only the fate of the little sea-born island I love that is in the balance — nor of Canada — nor of England. It's the fate of mankind. That is what we're fighting for. And we shall win — never for a moment doubt that, Rilla. For it isn't oniy the living who are fighting — the dead are fighting too.

About the author (1921)

One of the best-loved children's/young adult authors, Lucy Maud Montgomery was born on November 30, 1874 in Clifton, Prince Edward Island, Canada, the daughter of Hugh John and Clara Woolner. After attending Prince of Wales College and Dalhouse College in Halifax, she became a certified teacher, eventually teaching in Bideford, Prince Edward Island. She also served as an assistant at the post office and as a writer for the local newspaper, The Halifax Daily Echo. Best known for her Anne of Avonlea and Anne of Green Gables books, Montgomery received many high honors. She was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 1923 and a Canadian stamp commemorates Montgomery and Anne of Green Gables. In addition, various museums dedicated to the book series and Montgomery's life dot Prince Edward Island. The books in the Anne series follow the growth and adventures of a red-haired, spritely, high-spirited and imaginative orphan named Anne who lives on Prince Edward Island. The success of these books rested in Montgomery's ability to vividly recollect childhood and her easy storytelling ability. They are tremendously popular to this day and have been translated into more than 35 languages and adapted as movies and PBS television productions. On July 5, 1911, L.M. Montgomery married Ewan Macdonald, a Presbyterian minister, and the marriage produced three children. She died on April 24, 1942.

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