The Harleian Miscellany: Or, A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, as Well in Manuscript as in Print, Found in the Late Earl of Oxford's Library ; Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes, Volume 7

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William Oldys, John Malham
R. Dutton, 1810 - Great Britain
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Page 92 - And he spake unto the congregation, saying, Depart, I pray you, from the tents of these wicked men, and touch nothing of theirs, lest ye be consumed in all their sins.
Page 325 - And that servant, which knew his lord's will, and prepared not himself, neither did according to his will, shall be beaten with many stripes. Bat he that knew not, and did commit things worthy of stripes, shall be beaten with few stripes. For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required...
Page 445 - All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.
Page 443 - And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters. And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so. And God called the firmament Heaven. And the evening and the morning were the second day.
Page 313 - And when it was day, certain of the Jews banded together, and bound themselves under a curse, saying that they would neither eat nor drink till they had killed Paul.
Page 210 - ... the estates and lives of three kingdoms as much at his disposal, as was the little inheritance of his father, and to be as noble and liberal in the spending of them ; and lastly, (for there is no end of all the particulars of his glory) to bequeath all this with one word to his posterity ; to die with peace...
Page 206 - ... and therefore by no means could be omitted here) the vast multitude of spectators made up, as it uses to do-, no small part of the spectacle itself. But yet, I know not how, the whole was so managed, that, methought, it somewhat represented the life of him for whom it was made; much noise, much tumult, much expence, much magnificence, much vainglory ; briefly, a great show, and yet, after all this, but an ill sight.
Page 223 - Their feet run to evil, and they make haste to shed innocent blood: their thoughts are thoughts of iniquity; wasting and destruction are in their paths.
Page 314 - THIS is the third time I am coming to you. In the mouth of two or three witnesses shall every word be established.
Page 209 - At which he told me, that he had no other concernment for his late highness, than as he took him to be the greatest man that ever was of the English nation, if not, said he, of the whole world ; which gives me a just title to the defence of his reputation, since I now account myself, as it were, a naturalised English angel, by having had so long the management of the affairs of that country. And pray, countryman...

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