The House by the Churchyard

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 2007 - Gothic fiction (Literary genre) - 560 pages
0 Reviews
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu is best known today as one of the Victorian period's leading exponents of supernatural fiction, and was described by M.R. James as standing 'absolutely in the first rank as a writer of ghost stories'. The House by the Churchyard is perhaps his best novel in this genre. Set in the village of Chapelizod, near Dublin, in the 1760s the story opens with the accidental disinterment of an old skull in the churchyard, and an eerie late-night funeral. This discovery relates to murders, both recent and historical whose repercussions disrupt the complacent pace of village affairs and change the lives of many of its notable characters forever. Charm and chilling darkness abound in equal measure in one of the greatest novels of a Victorian master of mystery.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
3
III
12
IV
16
V
19
VI
23
VII
31
VIII
39
IX
43
LII
250
LIII
256
LIV
262
LV
265
LVI
270
LIX
276
LX
279
LXI
282

X
49
XI
54
XII
59
XIII
65
XIV
70
XV
77
XVI
80
XVII
84
XVIII
89
XIX
98
XX
104
XXI
110
XXII
113
XXIII
120
XXIV
125
XXV
129
XXVI
135
XXVII
139
XXVIII
145
XXIX
148
XXX
153
XXXI
157
XXXII
163
XXXIII
168
XXXIV
171
XXXV
175
XXXVI
178
XXXVII
183
XXXVIII
187
XXXIX
191
XL
196
XLI
200
XLII
203
XLIII
209
XLIV
214
XLV
218
XLVI
223
XLVII
227
XLVIII
231
XLIX
235
L
243
LI
247
LXII
287
LXIII
292
LXIV
297
LXV
303
LXVI
307
LXVII
311
LXVIII
317
LXIX
323
LXX
327
LXXI
332
LXXII
336
LXXV
346
LXXVI
352
LXXVII
357
LXXVIII
362
LXXIX
366
LXXXI
371
LXXXII
377
LXXXIII
383
LXXXIV
388
LXXXV
394
LXXXVI
398
LXXXVII
405
LXXXVIII
410
LXXXIX
417
XC
422
XCI
427
XCII
434
XCIII
441
XCIV
448
XCV
458
XCVI
465
XCVII
471
XCVIII
477
XCIX
486
C
493
CI
502
CII
508
CIII
519
CIV
525
CV
538
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

The greatest author of supernatural fiction during the nineteenth century was undoubtedly J. Sheridan Le Fanu. Le Fanu was born in Dublin and, as with so many other English popular fiction authors of his time, entered the genre of fiction by way of journalism, working on such publications as the Evening Mail and the Dublin University Magazine. Le Fanu came from a middle-class background; his family was of Huguenot descent. He graduated from Trinity College and married in 1844. After his wife died in 1858, until his own death, Le Fanu was known as a recluse, creating his ghost fiction late at night in bed. Probably he began writing ghost fiction in 1838; his earliest supernatural story is often cited as being either "The Ghost and the Bone-Setter" or the "Fortunes of Sir Robert Ardagh," both of which were later collected in the anthology entitled The Purcell Papers (1880). Writing most effectively in the short story form, Le Fanu's tales such as "Carmilla" (a vampire story that is thought possibly to have influenced Bram Stoker's Dracula) and the problematic "Green Tea" are considered by many literary scholars to be classics of the supernatural genre. His lengthy Gothic novels, such as Uncle Silas (1864), though less highly regarded than his shorter fiction, are nonetheless wonderfully atmospheric. Le Fanu's particular brand of literary horror tends toward the refined, subtle fright rather than the graphic sensationalism of Matthew Gregory Lewis. His work influenced other prominent horror fiction authors, including M. R. James.

Bibliographic information