Anglers' Evenings

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A. Heywood, 1882 - Fishing - 276 pages
 

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Page 15 - Whate'er the theme, the maiden sang As if her song could have no ending; I saw her singing at her work, And o'er the sickle bending; — I listened, motionless and still; And, as I mounted up the hill The music in my heart I bore, Long after it was heard no more.
Page 262 - Auld Lang Syne" brings Scotland, one and all, Scotch plaids, Scotch snoods, the blue hills, and clear streams, The Dee, the Don, Balgounie's brig's black wall, All my boy feelings, all my gentler dreams Of what I then dreamt, clothed in their own pall, Like Banquo's offspring: — floating past me seems My childhood, in this childishness of mine: I care not — 'tis a glimpse of "Auld Lang Syne.
Page 253 - That wishes her to speed ! I cuist my line in Largo Bay, And fishes I caught nine ; There's three to boil, and three to fry, And three to bait the line. The boatie rows, the boatie rows, The boatie rows indeed ; And happy be the lot of a...
Page 219 - Then down the wind came the boom of the great stanchion-gun; and after that sound another sound, louder as it neared; a cry as of all the bells of Cambridge, and all the hounds of Cottesmore; and overhead rushed and whirled the skein of terrified wild-fowl, screaming, piping, clacking, croaking, filling the air with the hoarse rattle of their wings, while clear above all sounded the wild whistle of the curlew, and the trumpet note of the great wild swan.
Page 263 - auld town ' of Aberdeen, with its one arch and its black deep salmon stream, is in my memory as yesterday. I still remember, though perhaps I may misquote the awful proverb which made me pause to cross it, and yet lean over it with a childish delight, being an only son, at least by the mother's side.
Page 218 - Crowland, by many a mere and many an ea; through narrow reaches of clear brown glassy water; between the dark-green alders; between the pale-green reeds; where the coot clanked, and the bittern boomed, and the sedge-bird, not content with its own sweet song, mocked the notes of all the birds around...
Page 249 - Two ancient fishers once lay side by side On piled-up sea-wrack in their wattled hut, Its leafy wall their curtain. Near them lay The weapons of their trade, basket and rod, Hooks, weed-encumbered nets, and cords and oars, And, propped on rollers, an infirm old boat. Their pillow was a scanty mat, eked out With caps and garments : such the ways and means, Such the whole treasury of the fishermen. They knew no luxuries : owned nor door nor dog; Their craft their all, their mistress Poverty : Their...
Page 263 - auld town' of Aberdeen, with its one arch and its black deep salmon stream, is in my memory as yesterday. I still remember, though perhaps I may misquote the awful proverb which made me pause to cross it, and yet lean over it with a childish delight, being an only son, at least by the mother's side. The saying, as recollected by me, was this, but 1 have never heard or seen it since I was nine years of age : " Brig of Balgounie, black 's your wa', Wi...
Page 182 - This amounts to the same with saying, that, in the case before us, the sine of the angle of incidence is to the sine of the angle of refraction in a given ratio.
Page 266 - ... three inch wide.' The existing arrangement, by which the stakes or hecks which prevent the passage of the larger fish must be so far apart as to permit the young salmon or fry to pass through freely, is thus as old as the time of the great founder of our Scottish monasteries and cathedrals. The Saturday's slop or opening is effected by drawing up the hecks to the height of an ell from the bottom of the river, in which position they must remain from Saturday evening at sunset till Monday morning...

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