The North Country Angler; Or, The Art of Angling: As Practised in the Northern Counties of England

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown; Leeds, Robinson, Son, and Holdsworth, 1817 - Fishing - 89 pages
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Contents

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Page 41 - ... with emotions and signs of pleasure. All the roes that are smit or touched by the milt, which is of a viscous quality, sink among the little stones and gravel ; and those that are not touched with it, are carried down the stream, and are delicious food for the many trouts that are watching the opportunity ; then the...
Page 65 - If you come to a woody place where you have no such conveniences, and where, perhaps, there is a long pool, and no angling with the fly, or throwing the rod, there you may be sure of many large fish.
Page 91 - The art of angling. Wherein are discovered many rare secrets, very necessary to be known by all that delight in that recreation.
Page 42 - If it is rainy or hazy weather, they will be three or four nights in finishing their work, but frosty weather puts them in a hurry, and they will have done in two nights or less, and hasten down to their holds, and take the first opportunity to get to sea. In this manner...
Page 38 - ... the lice bite them ; and nothing cures them of these tormentors so soon as the fresh water; and then again, when they have been about a month in the river, and lie under banks, roots or stones, the fresh water lice creep on to them, and force them to get to sea again, to be freed from them, which the salt water does effectually. And here I must observe , how this migration of these creatures answers the same end of Providence, with that of woodcocks, quails, &c. and several kinds of fish that...
Page 66 - ... apter to turn quick in the water: that done, pull back that part of your line which was slack when you did put your hook into the minnow the second time ; I say, pull that part of your line back, so that it shall fasten the head, so that the body of the minnow shall be almost straight on your hook : this done, try how it will turn, by drawing it across the water or against...
Page 68 - I wrap on a strong hook, about half the size of the other. I put the point of the large hook in at the mouth of the minnow, and out at the tail, on the right side of the minnow...
Page 41 - This he does all by himself, for I never saw the she fish along with the he, when he was making a new hole at the head of the other. — Sometimes I have seen him lie still in the hole...
Page 40 - ... bottoms, and, when feeding, generally prefers the rough and upper parts of gentle streams, and the tails of large ones ; after their feeding time, they retire to the deep and broad water, and swim very fast, usually in the middle of the river near the ground, and more at night than in the day, resting at convenient places, under bushes, weeds, banks, or stones, and then the whole shoal run again. Salmon bite best from six until eleven in the forenoon, and from three in the afternoon until sunset,...
Page 39 - ... size of the salmon ; in some, above an inch long and taper, and this gib, as it grows, makes for itself a socket, or hole, in the upper jaw, which nails up his mouth when it is shut; and, besides, all the fore part of the head is at this time more tough and bony. " This is one of the numberless works of the God of nature, by which the fish is armed and prepared for the work he has to do when he arrives at the proper places for spawning.

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