The Evidential Argument from Evil

Front Cover
Daniel Howard-Snyder
Indiana University Press, Oct 17, 2008 - Philosophy - 384 pages

Is evil evidence against the existence of God? Even if God and evil are compatible, it remains hotly contested whether evil renders belief in God unreasonable. The Evidential Argument from Evil presents five classic statements on this issue by eminent philosophers and theologians and places them in dialogue with eleven original essays reflecting new thinking by these and other scholars. The volume focuses on two versions of the argument. The first affirms that there is no reason for God to permit either certain specific horrors or the variety and profusion of undeserved suffering. The second asserts that pleasure and pain, given their biological role, are better explained by hypotheses other than theism.

Contributors include William P. Alston, Paul Draper, Richard M. Gale, Daniel Howard-Snyder, Alvin Plantinga, William L. Rowe, Bruce Russell, Eleonore Stump, Richard G. Swinburne, Peter van Inwagen, and Stephen John Wykstra.

 

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Contents

1 The Problem of Evil and Some Varieties of Atheism
1
An Evidential Problem for Theists
12
3 Some Major Strands of Theodicy
30
4 Aquinas on the Sufferings of Job
49
5 Epistemic Probability and Evil
69
6 The Inductive Argument from Evil and the Human Cognitive Condition
97
7 Rowes Noseeum Arguments from Evil
126
8 The Problem of Evil the Problem of Air and the Problem of Silence
151
11 Some Difficulties in Theistic Treatments of Evil
206
12 Reflections on the Chapters by Draper Russell and Gale
219
13 On Being Evidentially Challenged
244
A Second Look
262
15 The Argument from Inscrutable Evil
286
16 Some Temporarily Final Thoughts on Evidential Arguments from Evil
311
BIBLIOGRAPHY
333
CONTRIBUTORS
351

9 The SkepticalTheist
175
10 Defenseless
193

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About the author (2008)

DANIEL HOWARD-SNYDER is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Seattle Pacific University.

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