The House of the Seven Gables

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Harvard University Press, Nov 20, 2009 - Fiction - 326 pages
2 Reviews

Following on the heels of The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables was intended to be a far sunnier book than its predecessor and one that would illustrate ‚eoethe folly‚e of tumbling down on posterity ‚eoean avalanche of ill-gotten gold, or real estate.‚e Many critics have faulted the novel for its explaining away of hereditary guilt or its contradictory denial of it. Denis Donoghue instructs the reader in a fresh appreciation of the novel.

The John Harvard Library edition reproduces the authoritative text of The House of the Seven Gables in the Centenary Edition of the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne.


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Review: The House of the Seven Gables

User Review  - Mary Piscola -

I really enjoyed the authors style of writing. His description of the house and people made you feel you were right there with them !! I would recommend reading. Read full review

Review: The House Of The Seven Gables

User Review  - Sylvia Black -

In this book, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, two brothers live in a haunted, or cursed house. One brother is a monk and the other half mad run away from the very few visitors they get. Their niece comes to ... Read full review


The Old Pyncheon Family
The Little ShopWindow
The First Customer
A Day Behind the Counter
May and November
Maules Well
The Guest
The Pyncheon of ToDay
Alice Pyncheon
Phoebes Good Bye
The Scowl and Smile
Cliffords Chamber
The Flight of Two Owls
Governor Pyncheon
Alices Posies
The Flower of Eden

Clifford and Phoebe
The PyncheonGarden
The Arched Window
The Daguerreotypist
The Departure
Selected Bibliography

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About the author (2009)

Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts. When he was four years old, his father died. Years later, with financial help from his maternal relatives who recognized his literary talent, Hawthorne was able to enroll in Bowdoin College. Among his classmates were the important literary and political figures Horatio Bridge, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Franklin Pierce. These friends supplied Hawthorne with employment during the early years after graduation while Hawthorne was still establishing himself as a legitimate author. Hawthorne's first novel, Fanshawe, which he self-published in 1828, wasn't quite the success that he had hoped it would be. Not willing to give up, he began writing stories for Twice-Told Tales. These stories established Hawthorne as a leading writer. In 1842, Hawthorne moved to Concord, Massachusetts, where he wrote a number of tales, including "Rappaccini's Daughter" and "Young Goodman Brown," that were later published as Mosses from an Old Manse. The overall theme of Hawthorne's novels was a deep concern with ethical problems of sin, punishment, and atonement. No one novel demonstrated that more vividly than The Scarlet Letter. This tale about the adulterous Puritan Hester Prynne is regarded as Hawthorne's best work and is a classic of American literature. Other famous novels written by Hawthorne include The House of Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance. In 1852, Hawthorne wrote a campaign biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce. After Pierce was elected as President of the United States, he rewarded Hawthorne with the Consulship at Liverpool, England. Hawthorne died in his sleep on May 19, 1864, while on a trip with Franklin Pierce.

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