The Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, Volume 37

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Entomologist's Monthly Magazine Limited, 1901 - Entomology
 

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Page 56 - contains Original Articles on all subjects coming within the domain of Science, contributed by the most eminent scientific writers of the day. It also contains Reviews of...
Page 198 - NATURE: A Weekly Illustrated Journal of Science. NATURE contains Original Articles on all subjects coming within the domain of Science, contributed by the most eminent Scientists, belonging to all parts of the world. Reviews, setting forth the nature and value of recent Scientific works, are written for NATURE by men who are acknowledged masters in their particular departments.
Page 80 - A Monographic Revision and Synopsis of the Trichoptera of the European Fauna ; ' by the Author, Robert McLachlan.
Page 98 - Borneo) are occasionally substituted for the wrappers. On this journey some strange articles of diet were served up to us, among them being red ants, toads, bee-grubs, and a species of cicada. The manner in which the latter are caught is peculiar. Two or three natives gather at night round a brightly burning wood fire, one of them holding a lighted torch. The others clap their hands at regular intervals, and the cicada?, attracted by the noise and guided by the light, fly down and settle upon the...
Page 50 - July last, where the species was unusually abundant Papers were communicated on " Observations on some species of Orina, a genus of viviparous and ovo-viviparous beetles, by Mr. GC Champion and Dr. TA Chapman," reported by Dr. TA Chapman : " Illustrations of the sixth male ventral segment in seventeen Osmia species of the adunca group, with a note on the synonymy of three species, and descriptions of five which appear to be new,
Page 21 - France, for 1899. These authors concluded that insects were captured only by immature flowers, the anther-wings, in the cleft between which the proboscis of the insect is caught, being at that time stiff and resistant ; but when the flowers are ripe the antherwings become less rigid and do not offer sufficient resistance to the withdrawal of the proboscis, which carries with it the pollinia ready to be transferred to the stigma of the next flower visited by the insect.
Page 27 - Bottle of Mite Destroyer, I/ Willow Chip Boxes, nested, four sizes, 2/6 gross. Setting and Drying House, complete, 10/6, 12/6, and 15/6 Pocket Box, 6d., 9d., 1 , and 1/6 Postal Boxes, 6d. The Entomologist's Store and Setting House, containing every requisite, £3 Improved Pocket Lanthorns, 4/ and 5/, Zinc Oval Pocket Box, 1/6, 2/, and 2/6 Pupa Diggers, 2/ and 3/ Beating Tray...
Page 251 - Species of well-named LEPIDOPTERA, set or in papers, from all parts of the world, in fiuest condition; 1250 kinds of PREPARED LARVAE ; numerous LIVING PUP^E, &c.
Page 21 - ... concluded that insects were captured only by immature flowers, the anther-wings, in the cleft between which the proboscis of the insect is caught, being at that time stiff and resistant ; but when the flowers are ripe the anther-wings become less rigid and do not offer sufficient resistance to the withdrawal of the proboscis, which carries with it the pollinia ready to be transferred to the stigma of the next flower visited by the insect. — Mr. Tutt exhibited, for the Rev.
Page 22 - Formica sanguínea at Weybridge, in which he found males and workers of that species, he found also males and females as well as workers of the slave-ant Formica fusca, an experience somewhat different...

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