The Business of Books: Booksellers and the English Book Trade 1450-1850

Front Cover
In 1450 very few English men or women were personally familiar with a book; by 1850, the great majority of people daily encountered books, magazines, or newspapers. This book explores the history of this fundamental transformation, from the arrival of the printing press to the coming of steam. James Raven presents a lively and original account of the English book trade and the printers, booksellers, and entrepreneurs who promoted its development.
Viewing print and book culture through the lens of commerce, Raven offers a new interpretation of the genesis of literature and literary commerce in England. He draws on extensive archival sources to reconstruct the successes and failures of those involved in the book trade—a cast of heroes and heroines, villains, and rogues. And, through groundbreaking investigations of neglected aspects of book-trade history, Raven thoroughly revises our understanding of the massive popularization of the book and the dramatic expansion of its markets over the centuries.
 

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Contents

the enterprise of booksellers l
11
early modern commerce
46
new horizons
83
the supremacy of
119
locating the trades
154
stationers printers
193
the late
221
Chapter Nine Promoting the wares
257
Chapter Ten Risking failure
294
nineteenthcentury
320
Chapter Twelve Conclusion
351
Historiographical overview
373
Select bibliography
435
Index
456
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About the author (2007)

James Raven is professor of modern history, University of Essex. He is the author of numerous studies in cultural history and has published extensively on the history of the book and related topics.

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