A Collection of State Papers Relative to the War Against France Now Carrying on by Great Britain and the Several Other European Powers ...

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John Debritt
J. Debrett, 1799 - Europe
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Page 164 - Hidalgo, and the said article and the thirty-third article of the treaty of Amity, commerce, and navigation...
Page 164 - Great activity has been exerted by those persons who have insinuated themselves among the Indian tribes residing within the territory of the United States to influence them to transfer their affections and force to a foreign nation, to form them into a confederacy, and prepare them for war against the United States.
Page 576 - No Freeman shall be taken, or imprisoned, or be disseised of his Freehold, or Liberties, or free Customs, or be outlawed, or exiled, or any otherwise destroyed; nor will we pass upon him, nor condemn him, but by lawful Judgment of his Peers, or by the Law of the Land. We will sell to no man, we will not deny or defer to any man either Justice or Right.
Page 183 - In Testimony whereof I have caused these Letters to be made, Patent and the Seal of the United States to be hereunto affixed.
Page 417 - With this conduct of the French government, it will be proper to take into view the public audience given to the late minister of the United States, on his taking leave of the executive directory. The speech of the president discloses sentiments more alarming than the refusal of a 'minister, because more dangerous to our independence and union, and at the same time studiously marked with indignities towards the government of the United States.
Page 229 - But this practice could not be permitted within the rivers, harbours or other places of a neutral, where its sovereignty was complete. It follows then that the full right of affording protection to all property whatever, within its own territory, which is inherent in every government, is not transferred to a vessel navigating the high seas. The right of a...
Page 194 - The diplomatic intercourse between the United States and France being at present suspended, the Government has no means of obtaining official information from that country. Nevertheless, there is reason to believe that the Executive Directory passed a decree on the...
Page 420 - ... either, contraband goods being always excepted. It is also agreed, in like manner, that the same liberty be extended to persons who are on board a free ship, with this effect, that although they be enemies to both or either party, they are not to be taken out of that free ship, unless they are officers or soldiers, and in the actual service of the enemies...
Page 167 - Europe, the powers vested in our envoys were commensurate with a liberal and pacific policy and that high confidence which might justly be reposed in the abilities, patriotism, and integrity of the characters to whom the negotiation was...
Page 435 - ... and those of their agents, to countenance and invigorate opposition ; their disregard of solemn treaties and the laws of nations ; their war upon our defenceless commerce ; their treatment of our ministers of peace...

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