The Universe a Vast Electric Organism

Front Cover
G. W. Dillingham Company, 1903 - Science - 302 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Sometimes mystical poets can grasp complex metaphysical concepts..and intuitively understand realities of our astrophysical world..I think he may be correct and that our universe is mostly electrical and with gravity to the mix ..

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 160 - AN entire history of anything must include its appearance out of the imperceptible and its disappearance into the imperceptible. Be it a single object or the whole universe, any account which begins with it in a concrete form, or leaves off with it in a concrete form, is incomplete; since there remains an era of its knowable existence undescribed and unexplained.
Page 224 - All this world is heavy with the promise of greater things, and a day will come, one day in the unending succession of days, when beings, beings who are now latent in our thoughts and hidden in our loins, shall stand upon this earth as one stands upon a footstool, and shall laugh and reach out their hands amidst the stars.
Page 270 - ... no being endowed with powers of influencing the course of nature as much greater than his, as his is greater than a snail's,' seems to me not merely baseless, but impertinent. Without stepping beyond the analogy of that which is known, it is easy to people the cosmos with entities, in ascending scale, until we reach something practically indistinguishable from omnipotence, omnipresence, and omniscience.
Page 304 - INVISIBLE LIGHT; or, The Electric Theory of Creation. By GEORGE W. WARDER. " He holds there are only three elemental substances in nature: spirit, electricity and matter. Matter is controlled by electricity, and electricity is controlled by spirit intelligence. That in discovering electricity man has found the working force of Deity, and uses it in all fields of human effort. The arguments are convincing, and the book attractive and entertaining.
Page 208 - Faith in the gods or in the saints cures one, faith in little pills another, hypnotic suggestion a third, faith in a plain common doctor a fourth. In all ages the prayer of faith has healed the sick, and the mental attitude of the suppliant seems to be of more consequence than the powers to which the prayer is addressed.
Page 195 - The heavens declare the glory of God: And the firmament showeth His handiwork. Day unto day uttereth speech: And night unto night showeth knowledge.
Page 270 - Looking at the matter from the most rigidly scientific point of view, the assumption that, amidst the myriads of worlds scattered through endless space, there can be no intelligence, as much greater than man's as his is greater than a blackbeetle's; no being endowed with powers of influencing the course of nature as much greater than his, as his is greater than a snail's, seems to me not merely baseless, but impertinent.
Page 270 - ... his is greater than a snail's, seems to me not merely baseless, but impertinent. Without stepping beyond the analogy of that which is known, it is easy to people the cosmos with entities, in ascending scale, until we reach something practically indistinguishable from omnipotence, omnipresence and omniscience. If our intelligence can, in some matters, surely reproduce the past of thousands of years ago and anticipate the future, thousands of years hence, it is clearly within the limits of possibility...
Page 201 - breathed his breath ' into man ; that is to say. he has given man a part of himself — a soul. He follows with fatherly love and interest the development of the human race ; in order to lead it and to advance it further, he ' reveals ' himself, now in this, now in that, great sage, whether it be priest or king, whether it be among heathens, Jews, or Christians. Hammurabi was one of these, and so were Moses, Abraham. Homer. Charlemagne, Luther, Shakespeare, Goethe. Kant...
Page 282 - No fortuitous concourse of atoms, even with all eternity for them to clash and combine in, could compass this feat of the formation of the first optically active organic compound.

Bibliographic information