A History of Greece: From the Earliest Period to the Close of the Generation Contemporary with Alexander the Great, Volume 8

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J. Murray, 1862 - Greece
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Contents

Characteristies of the first Philippic
66
Change of sentiments at Olynthus The Olynthians conclude alliance
75
Just appreciation of the situation poses Apollodorus is indicted
93
Dionysiac festival at Athens in ancient religious festivals
99
CHAPTER LXXXIX
107
Indirect overtures for peace be the Athenian envoys on their
125
Party opposed to Phafeekns in them
131
Journey of the envoys to Pella ib secret good intentions of Philip
137
Domosthenos urges the envoys to Phatekus at Thermopylae
154
schinfis and the envoys proclaim The Amphiktyonic assembly
160
Letter of Philip favourably re jEschines even from his
166
Sentiments of Demosthenes he torsDemosthenes defends
182
Movements and intrigues of vantages of peace
188
Individual hardship and bad pub less
206
Language of an Amphissian with him against Athens 16
212
Vigorous resolutions taken at Hellenic world
231
Macedonian phalanx its long Alexander of Epirus
237
State of Greece at Alexanders Encouragements held out by Persia
261
his father Family discord ib tus and the lllyrians
267
Alexander is chosen Imperator of the news 271
275
Language of the complaining Extreme terror spread throughout
281
Embassy of the Athenians to the Grecian synod interview
284
During Alexanders reign the Macedonian cavalryits excellence
297
Changes in Grecian warfare an heroes
304
Light infantry of the lineHy Persian force assembled in Phry
310
Macedonia and Greece 310 chief of the Persians
321
Unskilfulness of the Persian lead garrison by sea retaining only
328
Progress of Memnon and the Per mense landforce
336
Criticism of Arrian on Dariuss Effects produced in Greece by
338
March of Alexander from Gordium nian projects crushed
353
Proceedings against Fhilotas son he causes Bessus to be muti
421
Farther subjugation of Baktria and daspos defeating Porusgener
433
Banquet at Marakanda Character His farther conquests in the Pun
440
Public harangue of Anaxarchus back to Persis Conduct
446
Alexander reduces the country be disbands them all
452
ander as a military man
467
So hope of his life Consterna hellenized the great fact was
475
State of the Grecian world when Phokion and Demades were lead
482
Accusatory harangue of Escluius others as guilty of corrupt
501
Circumstances attending the arri Grecian cities directing that
508
Effect produced in Greece by the the satrapies are distributed
517
Reluctance of the Greek contin the Grecian exiles He puts
523
FROM THE LAMIAN WAR TO THE CLOSE OF THE HISTOBY OF FBEE
528
Intrigues with Perdikkas and with for Kassander
540
Ineffectual attempts of Eumenes his friends for exclusion of non
546
Explanation of this alteration sander assassinates the young
563
Kassander passes into Macedonia Opposition made by Demochares
569
Idolatry Bhown to JJemetrius at metrius acquires the crown
578
Constitution established by Time thoklus readmitted swears
588
Farther internal changes at Syra home
594
Hat tie of the Himera between against Agathokles and
609
Treachery of the Carthaginian Grecian cities
615
Eoryalus but i totally defeated nians they gain two great
621
Danger of Archagathus he is tion imprudently pushed
626
African expedition of Agathokles but becomes then subordinate
632
Massaliaits situation and circum governmentthe native Mari
639
his prudent dealing with the afterwards renewed
653
Herakleia emancipated from the pire over barbaric tribes 058
659
VOL VIII
673

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Page 468 - There remained moreover the Asiatic regions east of the Hyphasis, which his soldiers had refused to enter upon, but which he certainly would have invaded at a future opportunity, were it only to efface the poignant humiliation of having been compelled to relinquish his proclaimed purpose. Though this sounds like romance and hyperbole...
Page 466 - ... had been when he first crossed the Hellespont. Great as his past career had been, his future achievements, with such increased means and experience, were likely to be yet greater. His ambition would have been satisfied with nothing less than the conquest of the whole habitable world as then known; and if his life had been prolonged, he would probably have accomplished it. Nowhere (so far as our knowledge reaches) did there reside any military power capable of making head against him; nor were...
Page 304 - Neoptolemus, and the other heroes of the /Eacid race — ' a man of violent impulse in all directions, sometimes generous, often vindictive — ardent in his individual affections both of love and hatred, but devoured especially by an inextinguishable pugnacity, appetite for conquest, and thirst for establishing at all cost his superiority of force over others.
Page 469 - Now, how an empire thus boundless and heterogeneous, such as no prince has ever yet realized, could have been administered with any superior advantages to subjects, it would be difficult to show. The mere task of acquiring and maintaining — of keeping satraps and tribute-gatherers in authority as well as in subordination — of suppressing resistances ever liable to recur in regions distant by months of march — would occupy the whole life of a world-conqueror, without leaving any leisure for...
Page 663 - Alexander, the epoch from which dates not only the extinction of Grecian political freedom and selfaction but also the decay of productive genius and the debasement of that consummate literary and rhetorical excellence which the fourth century BC had seen exhibited in Plato and Demosthenes.
Page 467 - Roman consul, annually changed, would have been found a match for Alexander in military genius and combinations ; nor, even if personally equal, would he have possessed the same variety of troops and arms, each effective in its separate way, and all conspiring to one common purpose ; nor the same unbounded influence over their minds in stimulating them to full effort. I do not think that even the Romans could have successfully resisted Alexander the Great ; though it is certain that he never throughout...
Page 287 - We call it a pretence, because it had ceased to be a real Hellenic feeling, and served now two different purposes : first, to ennoble the undertaking in the eyes of Alexander himself, whose mind was very accessible to religious and legendary sentiment, and who willingly identified himself with Agamemnon or Achilles, immortalised as executors of the collective vengeance of Greece for Asiatic insult ; next, to assist in keeping the Greeks quiet during his absence. He was himself aware that the real...
Page 461 - Hephaestion, fell more and more into discredit; whilst his son Kassander, who had recently come into Asia with a Macedonian reinforcement, underwent from Alexander during irascible moments much insulting violence. In spite of the dissuasive warning of the Chaldean priests, Alexander had been persuaded to distrust their sincerity and had entered Babylon, though not without hesitation and uneasiness. However, when after having entered the town he went out of it again safely on his expedition for the...
Page 472 - ... which the march of every Grecian community was based. Aristotle did not wish to degrade the Asiatics below the level to which they had been accustomed, but rather to preserve the Greeks from being degraded to the same level. Now, Alexander recognized no such distinction as that drawn by his preceptor. He treated Greeks and Asiatics alike, not by elevating the latter but by degrading the former. Though he employed all indiscriminately as instruments, yet he presently found the free speech of Greeks,...
Page 467 - Alexander overawes the imagination more than any other personage of antiquity, by the matchless development of all that constitutes effective force — as an individual warrior, and as organizer and leader of armed masses; not merely the blind impetuosity ascribed by Homer to Ares, but also the intelligent, methodized, and all-subduing compression which he personifies in Athene.

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