Colonel William Raymond Lee of the Revolution

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Essex Institute, 1917 - 29 pages
 

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Page 23 - Lee, Esquire, age 80, Collector for this District. Col. Lee was a native of Manchester, but removed in early life to Marblehead, where he was a distinguished merchant. In the commencement of the Revolutionary War he was appointed a major in Col. Glover's regiment, and afterwards Lieut. Colonel. He was esteemed as a brave and skillful officer, and enjoyed in a high degree the confidence of Washington and the other worthies of the Revolution. In 1801 he was appointed by President Jefferson to the office...
Page 16 - We were led into these delusive hopes by the very honorable treatment shown us by General Gates ; by that we received from you, Mr. President [Gon.
Page 16 - Rode Round the lines and found the Field Officers and some others Walking by their Barracks to keep themselves from Perishing with Cold, not one stick of Wood to put into the Fire, and if some other method cannot be found to supply them, they must either Perish or burn all the Publick Buildings. And am with Respect, Sir your most obdt Ser't, Will R. Lee. " To the Honorable Maj. Genl. Heath." Colonel Lee was ordered to take command at Cambridge by the following letter from Gen. Heath : — " Head...
Page 13 - ... general Lee lodged in a small house near which general Washington occasionally passed when observing the dispositions of the enemy : one day, accompanied by some of his officers, he called on general Lee and dined with him ; but no sooner were they gone than Lee, addressing his aid-du-camp, said, " You must look me out another place ; for I shall have Washington and all his puppies continually calling upon me, and they will eat me up.
Page 20 - ... pieces, but not such as might be expected from men who had been accustomed to this fault in an alarming excess. We were escorted by a proper guard at one o'clock to the Academy to a public dinner, at which 110 persons were received, & sumptuously entertained. Col Lee, whose elegant House is on the parade, gave us a Collation at 4 o'clock in a very polite & generous manner. At dinner every propriety was observed. After dinner the Toasts were drank. The Commander of the day [201] condescended in...
Page 20 - I was introduced into the family of Col. Lee at Tea. He has eight children and a very obliging wife. This gentleman has a very excellent person and was highly esteemed in the Continental Army and particularly by our illustrious Commander in Chief. His want of promotion in the militia depends on himself ... I went into the cupola upon the elevated seat of Col. Lee to enjoy the extensive view he has from that •Dearborn's Life of Col. Wm. R. Lee (MS.), p. 181. •(•Roads
Page 17 - The cartouche boxes which have commonly been made for the airny are made of the most miserable materials, and in case of storms commonly serve only to waste the ammunition which is carried in them. Colonel Lee, who undoubtedly may be called a martinet in military matters, is desirous that the boxes for the three regiments [Henley's, Jackson's and Lee's], which are to be posted here, may be made of better leather. He has brought me a sample. The first expence will be considerably more than that of...
Page 16 - He made a speech during the trial in the course of which he dwelt at length upon the unfortunate position of the officers and soldiers of his army, and the sanguine expectations which had been indulged " of their being received with all that magnanimity and kindness which was due them as prisoners of war.
Page 22 - State, and had at one time about 25,000 acres of this land, which was regarded as a good investment. Unfortunately for the investors, the State of Georgia, at the next session of its Legislature, declared the sale fraudulent, and therefore null and void, and ceded the whole tract to the United States in 1802. At almost the same time several of the consignees to whom his cargoes were consigned abroad failed, and Colonel Lee lost his cargoes, and about the same time the cruisers of France captured...
Page 17 - Lee has remedied one great evil, which was compelling our soldiers to purchase all their provisions at two stores in the barracks, and not permitting them to send to Cambridge, where they were much cheaper. Passes have been granted for a sergeant and a certain number of men to go out and purchase provisions, by which means the stores cannot impose on the troops ; and they now sell their commodities at the market price...

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