HISTORY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

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1853
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Page 267 - The Corporation presented him with the freedom of the city in a gold box, in acknowledging which he naturally dwelt on some of the topics that were interesting to a commercial community. He gave a somewhat new view of "Protection" when he called it a remnant of heathenism.
Page 292 - MOST of the houses are built of bricks ; and are generally strong and neat, and several stories high. Some had, according to old architecture, turned the gable-end towards the streets ; but the new houses were altered in this respect. Many of the houses had a balcony on the roof, on which the people...
Page 293 - There is no good water to be met with in the town itself ; but at a little distance there is a large spring of good water, which the inhabitants take for their tea and for the uses of the kitchen. Those, however, who are less delicate on this point make use of the water from the wells in town, though it be very bad.
Page 159 - ... of what nation soever, will, upon knowledge of this proclamation, acknowledge and testify themselves, to submit to this his majesty's government, as his good subjects, shall be protected in his majesty's laws and justice, and peaceably enjoy whatsoever God's blessing, and their own honest industry, have furnished them with; and all other privileges, with his majesty'* English subjects.
Page 173 - Nederlandts, under the commission and control of their High Mightinesses the Lords States General of the United Netherlands, and the privileged West India Company.
Page 159 - America, to the prejudice of his majesty's subjects, and diminution of his royal dignity ; we his said majesty's commissioners, do declare and promise, that whosoever, of what nation soever, will, upon knowledge of this proclamation, acknowledge and testify themselves, to submit to this his majesty's government, as his good subjects, shall be protected in his...
Page 296 - Thirty or forty gentlemen and ladies meet and dine together, drink tea in the afternoon, fish and amuse themselves till evening, and then return home in Italian chaises, (the fashionable carriage in this and most parts of America, Virginia excepted, where they chiefly make use of coaches, and these commonly drawn by six horses), a gentleman and lady in each chaise.
Page 173 - States-General of the United Netherlands and his Serene Highness the Lord Prince of Orange, and to maintain their sovereign Jurisdiction, right and domain over this country.
Page 266 - York meaning) think as Matters now stand, that their LIBERTIES and PROPERTIES are precarious, and that SLAVERY is like to be intailed on them and their Posterity, if some past Things be not amended, and this they collect from many past Proceedings.
Page 173 - Schepens shall be also bound to acknowledge their High Mightinesses the Lords States General of the United Netherlands and His Serene Highness the Lord Prince of Orange, as their Sovereign Rulers, and to maintain their High Jurisdiction, Right and Domain in this Country.

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