The Nautical Magazine: A Journal of Papers on Subjects Connected with Maritime Affairs, Volume 21

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Brown, Son and Ferguson, 1852 - Shipping
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Page 602 - I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of my Lords Commissioners of the Admir•alty, that at 5 o'clock pm on the 6th of August last, in latitude 24 44...
Page 171 - Venerable, off the coast of Holland, the i2th of October, by log (nth1 three PM Camperdown ESE eight mile. Wind N. by E. Sir, I have the pleasure to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that...
Page 38 - This may be safely laid down as a rule on all occasions, fog or clear, light or dark, that no steamer has a right to navigate at such a rate that it is impossible for her to prevent damage, taking all precaution at the moment she sees danger to be possible, and if she cannot do that without going less than five knots an hour, then she is bound to go at less than five knots an hour.
Page 436 - God, declare that from us, feeble as we are, the light of Christianity has gone forth ; while upon that curse of curses, the slave trade, a deadly blight has fallen as far as our influence extends.
Page 90 - The mail-boat, when lowered, was immediately swamped, with about twentyfive people in her, all of whom were lost. The pinnace, when lowered, sheered across the sea before the people in her could unhook the fore-tackle. They were thereby washed out, and the boat remained hanging by the bow.
Page 160 - 1 like a man who is in earnest. Sir John Franklin read the church service to-day and a sermon so very beautifully, that I defy any man not to feel the force of what he would convey. The first Sunday he read was a day or two before we sailed, when Lady Franklin, his daughter, and niece attended. Every one was struck with his extreme earnestness of manner, evidently proceeding from real conviction.
Page 172 - I HAVE the honour to report, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that their Lordships...
Page 566 - Majesty, anxious that this tribute of gratitude and sorrow should b deprived of nothing which could invest it with a thoroughly national character — anxious that the greatest possible number of her subjects should have an opportunity of joining it — is anxious, above all, that such honours should not appear to emanate from the Crown alone, and that the two Houses of Parliament should have an opportunity, by their previous sanction, of stamping the proposed ceremony with increased solemnity,...
Page 327 - American vessels ; but their returns have not been received; partial accounts of wreck and disaster only have reached us. They are startling. "The lives and property at stake there for the two years for which we have complete returns, may be thus stated: 1849. Number of American seamen, 4,650. Value of ships and outfit, $4,650,000 Value of oil taken, 2,606,510 Value of bone, 814,112 $8,070,622 1850.
Page 55 - Upwards of 500 persons had been destroyed by the terrible visitation, and an immense amount of property ; the country being laid waste for miles. The shipping in the harbour suffered severely, many vessels being destroyed and their crews drowned.

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