How Pleasure Works: The New Science of Why We Like What We Like

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W. W. Norton & Company, Jun 14, 2010 - Psychology - 304 pages
5 Reviews

“Engaging, evocative. . . . [Bloom] is a supple, clear writer, and his parade of counterintuitive claims about pleasure is beguiling.”—NPR

Why is an artistic masterpiece worth millions more than a convincing forgery? Pleasure works in mysterious ways, as Paul Bloom reveals in this investigation of what we desire and why. Drawing on a wealth of surprising studies, Bloom investigates pleasures noble and seamy, lofty and mundane, to reveal that our enjoyment of a given thing is determined not by what we can see and touch but by our beliefs about that thing’s history, origin, and deeper nature.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ohernaes - LibraryThing

"[...] people naturally assume that things in the world - including other people - have invisible essences that make them what they are. Experimental psychologists have argued that this essentialist ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - heike6 - LibraryThing

It was an enjoyable read with lots of interesting anecdotes, but there wasn't much content that didn't seem obvious. "By distorting experience, beliefs, including essentialist beliefs, garner support for themselves, which is one reason why it is so hard to change our minds about anything." Read full review

Contents

I
xi
II
1
III
25
IV
55
V
91
VI
117
VII
155
VIII
177
IX
203
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About the author (2010)

Paul Bloom is a professor of psychology at Yale University. He is the author of Descartes’ Baby and How Pleasure Works. He has contributed to The Atlantic, the New York Times, Science, and Nature. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

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