Ulysses

Front Cover
Echo Library, Feb 1, 2009 - Fiction - 528 pages
84 Reviews
A day in the life of Leopold Bloom, whose odyssey through the streets of turn-of-the-century Dublin leads him through trials that parallel those of Ulysses on his epic journey home.

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Roughly 50% of the prose is flat out spectacular. - LibraryThing
Hard to read, but I'm really glad I read it. - LibraryThing
It is the closest we have of prose as poetry. - LibraryThing

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User Review  - charlie68 - LibraryThing

A good but I don't know if I would recommend it to anyone. A literary work as a triathlon, demands a lot of the reader. At 800 pages plus it takes patience to stick with and then finish this work. At times coarse and at others heavenly lyrical. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jlsimon7 - LibraryThing

After having tried multiple times to read this book I decided to look at the reviews. I knew the book to be a masterpiece by repute and added it to my collection expecting to enjoy it. I've tried but ... Read full review

About the author (2009)

James Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, in Dublin, Ireland, into a large Catholic family. Joyce was a very good pupil, studying poetics, languages, and philosophy at Clongowes Wood College, Belvedere College, and the Royal University in Dublin. Joyce taught school in Dalkey, Ireland, before marrying in 1904. Joyce lived in Zurich and Triest, teaching languages at Berlitz schools, and then settled in Paris in 1920 where he figured prominently in the Parisian literary scene, as witnessed by Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast. Joyce's collection of fine short stories, Dubliners, was published in 1914, to critical acclaim. Joyce's major works include A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, and Stephen Hero. Ulysses, published in 1922, is considered one of the greatest English novels of the 20th century. The book simply chronicles one day in the fictional life of Leopold Bloom, but it introduces stream of consciousness as a literary method and broaches many subjects controversial to its day. As avant-garde as Ulysses was, Finnegans Wake is even more challenging to the reader as an important modernist work. Joyce died just two years after its publication, in 1941.

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