Flora Lyndsay: Or, Passages in an Eventful Life

Front Cover
De Witt & Davenport - Canadian fiction - 343 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 314 - The ungodly have drawn out the sword, and have bent their bow, to cast down the poor and needy, and to slay such as are of a right conversation.
Page 343 - For those who doubt the agency of an overruling Providence in the ordinary affairs of life, these trifling reminiscences have been penned. Reader, have faith in Providence. A good father is never indifferent to the welfare of his children — still less a merciful God.
Page 92 - tis the . most troublesome piece of lumber you have with you. A child and a cat are two things which never ought to come on board a ship. But take courage, my dear. Be like our brave Nelson; never look behind you after entering upon difficulties ; it only makes bad worse, and does no manner of good. You will encounter rougher gales than this before you have crossed the Atlantic.
Page 84 - Lyndsay, about to leave her English home for the backwoods of Canada: It was beneath the shade of these trees and reposing upon the velvet-like sward at their feet, that Flora had first indulged in those delicious reveries — those lovely, ideal visions of beauty and perfection — which cover with a tissue of morning beams all the rugged highways of life. Silent bosom friends were those dear old trees! Every noble sentiment of her soul, every fault that threw its baneful shadow on the sunlight...
Page 84 - ... shade of these trees and reposing upon the velvet-like sward at their feet, that Flora had first indulged in those delicious reveries — those lovely, ideal visions of beauty and perfection — which cover with a tissue of morning beams all the rugged highways of life. Silent bosom friends were those dear old trees! Every noble sentiment of her soul, every fault that threw its baneful shadow on the sunlight of her mind — had been fostered, or grown upon her, in those pastoral shades. Those...
Page 6 - Nay, don't look so despondingly. If you intended to remain in England, you should not have married a poor man.
Page 167 - Parties of emigrants and their friends were gathered together in small picturesque groups on the pier. The cheeks of the •women were pale and wet with tears. The words of blessing and farewell, spoken to those near and dear to them, were often interrupted by low, pitiful wails, and heart-breaking sobs.
Page 5 - FLORA, have you forgotten the talk we had about emigration, the morning before our marriage ?" was a question rather suddenly put to his young wife, by Lieutenant Lyndsay, as he paused in his walk to and fro in the room.
Page 316 - ... interest her husband" (215) and so justify her activity by serving the feminine function of "animating [him] to fresh exertions" (95). The eventual publication of the tale of Noah Cotton by the modest Flora is suggested, as are all of her actions, by submission to her husband's wishes and his taste: Flora finished her story, but she wanted courage to read it to her husband, who was very fastidious about his wife's literary performances. And many years passed away . . . before she again brought...
Page 84 - It had been built in the first year of good Queen Bess. The back part of the mansion appeared to have belonged to a period still more remote.

Bibliographic information