Report of the board of education [continued as] Report of the director of public instruction ... 1840-1951/52

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1851
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Page 111 - Hark, his hands the lyre explore ! Bright-eyed Fancy hovering o'er, Scatters from her pictured urn Thoughts that breathe and words that burn.
Page 118 - As spectacled she sits in chimney nook. But soon his eyes grew brilliant, when she told His lady's purpose; and he scarce could brook Tears, at the thought of those enchantments cold, And Madeline asleep in lap of legends old.
Page 126 - Careless their merits or their faults to scan, His pity gave ere charity began. Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And...
Page 119 - He spake of love, such love as Spirits feel In worlds whose course is equable and pure; No fears to beat away — no strife to heal — The past unsighed for, and the future sure...
Page 117 - When Cheerfulness, a nymph of healthiest hue, Her bow across her shoulder flung, Her buskins gemm'd with morning dew, Blew an inspiring air, that dale and thicket rung, The hunter's call to Faun and Dryad known...
Page 87 - BAC is cut off from the given circle ABC containing an angle equal to the given angle D : Which was to be done. PROP. XXXV. THEOR. If two straight lines within a circle cut one another, the rectangle contained by the segments of one of them is equal to the rectangle contained by the segments of the other.
Page 119 - Petrarch's wound; A thousand times this pipe did Tasso sound; With it Camoens soothed an exile's grief ; The sonnet glittered a gay myrtle leaf Amid the cypress with which Dante crowned His visionary brow: a glow-worm lamp, It cheered mild Spenser, called from Faery-land To struggle through dark ways; and when a damp Fell round the path of Milton, in his hand The thing became a trumpet ; whence he blew Soul-animating strains — alas, too few...
Page 119 - Of all that is most beauteous— imaged there In happier beauty; more pellucid streams, An ampler ether, a diviner air, And fields invested with purpureal gleams; Climes which the sun, who sheds the brightest day Earth knows, is all unworthy to survey.
Page 118 - Of fruits, and flowers, and bunches of knot-grass, And diamonded with panes of quaint device, Innumerable of stains and splendid dyes, As are the tiger-moth's deep-damask'd wings; And in the midst, 'mong thousand heraldries, And twilight saints, and dim emblazonings, A shielded scutcheon blush'd with blood of queens and kings.
Page 126 - ... country dear, And passing rich with forty pounds a year ; Remote from towns he ran his godly race, Nor e'er had...

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