Writer's Diary Volume 1: 1873-1876

Front Cover
Northwestern University Press, Jul 20, 1997 - Biography & Autobiography - 821 pages
1 Review
Winner of the AATSEEL Outstanding Translation Award

This is the first paperback edition of the complete collection of writings that has been called Dostoevsky's boldest experiment with literary form; it is a uniquely encyclopedic forum of fictional and nonfictional genres. The Diary's radical format was matched by the extreme range of its contents. In a single frame it incorporated an astonishing variety of material: short stories; humorous sketches; reports on sensational crimes; historical predictions; portraits of famous people; autobiographical pieces; and plans for stories, some of which were never written while others appeared in the Diary itself.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

A writer's diary

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Dostoevsky's unorthodox work, which began as a series of columns in 1873, is a pastiche of genres--fiction, journalism, political and cultural criticism, and autobiography. Intended as a vehicle for ... Read full review

Contents

September
36
Introduction
121
Old People
126
Environment
132
Something Personal
146
Vlas
156
Bobok
170
A Troubled Countenance
186
CHAPTER
471
The Defense Attorney and Kairova
479
The Defense Attorney and Velikanova
485
CHAPTER
491
A Democratic Spirit for Certain Women
500
CHAPTER
505
CHAPTER
515
Deduction from My Paradox
521

A HalfLetter from A Certain Person
195
Apropos of the Exhibition
205
An Impersonator
217
Dreams and Musings
234
Apropos of a New Play
241
Little Pictures
253
To a Teacher
263
Something about Lying
269
One of Todays Falsehoods
279
ANNOUNCEMENT
295
A Future Novel Another Accidental Family
301
The Golden Age in Your Pocket
307
A Colony of Young Offenders Dark Individuals
314
CHAPTER THREE
325
Spiritualism Something about Devils
332
A Word Apropos of My Biography
339
On Love of the People An Essential Contract with
347
CHAPTER
356
Mr Spasovichs Speech Clever Tactics
365
The Berries
373
The Family and Our Sacred Ideals A Concluding
383
A HundredYearOld Woman
389
Musings about Europe
399
CHAPTER
410
Lord Radstock
418
Isolated Phenomena
422
Minor Cultural Types Damaged People
429
Confusion and Inaccuracy in the Points at Issue
435
CHAPTER
449
Just a Bit More about Spiritualism
457
On Behalf of One Deceased
464
About Women Again
531
July and August
537
On the Pugnacity of the Germans
543
CHAPTER
550
The Germans and Labor Inexplicable Tricks
559
CHAPTER THREE
568
CHAPTER FOUR
577
Childrens Secrets
585
An Odd Summer for Russia
594
CHAPTER
605
Words Words Words
611
Dressing Gowns and Soap
618
Kifomokievism
625
Fears and Apprehensions
633
CHAPTER
641
A Few Remarks about Simplicity and Simplification
647
The Sentence
653
Cherniaev
660
On the Same Topic
667
CHAPTER
677
A Proposal of Marriage
683
Plans and More Plans
690
A Dreadful Recollection
698
Suddenly the Shroud Fell Away
706
CHAPTER
721
A Belated Moral
729
A Few Words about Young People
737
CHAPTER
743
Where Does the Matter Stand at the Moment?
749
notes
755
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский; IPA: [ˈfʲodər mʲɪˈxajləvʲɪtɕ dəstɐˈjefskʲɪj] ; 11 November 1821 - 9 February 1881 ) sometimes spelled Dostoevsky, was a Russian writer of novels, short stories and essays. Dostoyevsky's literary works explore human psychology in the troubled political, social and spiritual context of 19th-century Russian society. Although Dostoyevsky began writing books in the mid-1850s, his best remembered work was done in his last years, including Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. He wrote eleven novels, three novellas, seventeen short novels and three essays and is often acknowledged by critics as one of the greatest and most prominent psychologists in world literature.

Bibliographic information