The Practical Negotiator

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Yale University Press, 1982 - Political Science - 250 pages
The Practical Negotiator draws upon both theory and practice to present a model of the negotiation process. This text focuses primarily upon international negotiations. The Practical Negotiator will be of interest to those who seek a better understanding of the basic process and strategies of negotiation. This work is divided into six chapters with a foreword by Alvin Eurich. Eurich reviews the historical development of negotiation as a field of academic study. Chapter One serves as an introduction to the text. The authors' research has drawn upon three sources of data: the historical record, theories and experiments on bargaining behavior, and interviews with diplomats and UN ambassadors. Historical, experimental and personal cases are used throughout the text to illustrate their theoretical model. The authors also introduce the three key stages in their model of negotiation. In the first stage participants diagnose their situation. Secondly, they attempt to negotiate a formula or common understanding of their conflict, in terms which permit its resolution. The third stage settles the details of the conflict by applying the formula. In practice these stages may overlap. Chapter Two focuses on the skills and personality traits needed by the practical negotiator. Helpful personal characteristics include empathy, patience, self-assurance, ingenuity, and stamina. The authors consider briefly how these traits operate in personal interactions. They then discuss the importance of enabling trust in the negotiation process, and describe the skills needed to build trust. Of central importance is the credibility of the negotiators or participants.
 

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Contents

Theoretical and Practical Negotiations
1
The Practical Negotiator
16
The Formula Phase
87
The Detail
147
A Summary
199
Interviews
231
References
237
Index
245
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