The lintie o' Moray, poems chiefly composed for the anniversaries of the Edinburgh Morayshire society

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1851
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Page 5 - THE GRAVES OF A HOUSEHOLD. THEY grew in beauty side by side, They filled one home with glee, Their graves are severed far and wide, By mount, and stream, and sea.
Page 5 - ... O'er his low bed may weep. One sleeps where southern vines are drest Above the noble slain : He wrapt his colours round his breast On a blood-red field of Spain. And one — o'er her the myrtle showers Its leaves, by soft winds fanned ; She faded midst Italian flowers — The last of that bright band. And parted thus they rest, who played Beneath the same green tree ; Whose voices mingled as they prayed Around one parent knee...
Page 3 - Invidious grave! how dost thou rend in sunder Whom love has knit, and sympathy made one ? A tie more stubborn far than nature's band. Friendship! mysterious cement of the soul; Sweetener of life, and solder of society, I owe thee much.
Page 3 - Look on me ! there is an order Of mortals on the earth, who do become Old in their youth, and die ere middle age, Without the violence of warlike death ; Some perishing of pleasure, some of study, Some worn with toil, some of mere weariness. Some of disease, and some insanity, And some of wither'd or of broken hearts; For this last is a malady which slays More than are number'd in the lists of Fate, Taking all shapes and bearing many names.
Page 76 - Ask where's the North? at York, 'tis on the Tweed; In Scotland, at the Orcades; and there, At Greenland, Zembla, or the Lord knows where.
Page 2 - Dreams, that the soul of youth engage Ere Fancy has been quelled ; Old legends of the monkish page, Traditions of the saint and sage, Tales that have the rime of age, And chronicles of Eld.
Page 72 - Corn, the earth pours forth in wonderful and never-failing abundance. Fruits of all sorts, herbs, flowers, pulse are in the greatest plenty, and all early. While harvest has scarcely begun in surrounding districts, there all is ripe and cut down, and carried into open barnyards, as is the custom of the country ; and, in comparison with other districts, winter is hardly felt. The earth is almost always open, the sea navigable, and the roads never stopped. So much of the soil is occupied by crops of...
Page 72 - There is no product of this kingdom which does not thrive there perfectly ; or, if any fail, it is to be attributed to the sloth of the inhabitants, not to the fault of the soil or climate. Corn the earth pours forth in wonderful and never-failing abundance. Fruits of all sorts, herbs, flowers, pulse, are in the greatest plenty, and all early. While harvest has scarcely begun in surrounding districts, there all is ripe and cut down, and carried...
Page 72 - Sir Robert Gordon of Straloch h says, that " in salubrity of climate, Moray is not " inferior to any, and in richness and fertility of soil, it much exceeds our other " northern provinces. The air is so temperate, that when all around is bound up " in the rigour of winter, there are neither lasting snows nor such frosts as damage " fruits or trees ; proving the truth of that boast of the natives, that they have " forty days more of fine weather in every year than the neighbouring districts.
Page 58 - The dwellings of the citizens have put on a modern trim look, which does not satisfy the eye so well as the sober gray walls of their fathers. Numerous hospitals, the fruits of mixed charity and vanity, surround the town, and with their gaudy white domes and porticos, contrast offensively with the mellow colouring and chaste proportions of the ancient structures. If the present taste continues, there will soon...

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