Breaking the Bismarck's Barrier, 22 July 1942-1 May 1944

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University of Illinois Press, 2001 - History - 528 pages
Volume 6: Breaking the Bismarcks Barrier, 22 July 1942-1 May 1944 tracks the Allies' entrance into the offensive phase of the Pacific war. Having gained crucial victories at Midway and Guadalcanal, Allied forces committed substantially increased resources to breaking the Bismarcks barrier, a formidable net of Japanese air and naval bases stretching from the central Solomons to New Guinea, controlling all shipping between the Indian and Pacific Oceans.
 

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User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

This volume is about the evolution of the USN's amphibious warfare techniques towards their final level of efficiency. While there isn't a great open sea battle to describe, the student of the Pacific ... Read full review

Contents

Holding Papua MaySeptember 1942
27
Naval Aspects of the BunaGona Campaign Sep
41
Papuan Pause February 1943
51
Preparing an Offensive FebruaryMay 1943
89
Yamamotos Last Offensive AprilMay 1943
117
1x MacArthur Moves Forward 22 June6 July 1943
130
The Invasion of New Georgia 21 June5 July 1943
138
212
145
Finschhafen and Beyond 16 September20 October
269
PART III
277
ber
293
The Battle of Empress Augusta Bay 2 November
305
Carrier Strikes on Rabaul 518 November 1943
323
Securing the Beachhead 213 November 1943
337
Busy Thanksgiving 1525 November 1943
350
Perimeter Defense and Development 26 November
360

The Battles of Kula Gulf and Kolombangara
160
The Battle of Kolombangara 1213 July
180
Rescue Mission for Helena 617 July
191
Conclusion of the New Georgia Campaign 13 July
198
Vella Lavella 15 August7 October 1943
225
Lae and Salamaua 16 June15 September 1943
254
Moving Into New Britain December 1943January
369
Airsols Assault on Rabaul 17 December 1943
392
Northabout 25 December 194320 March 1944
410
The Battle of the Perimeter JanuaryMarch 1944
425
Admiralties Annexed 29 February1 May 1944
432
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Samuel Eliot Morison was born in Boston in 1887. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1912 and began teaching history there in 1915, becoming full professor in 1925 and Jonathan Trumbull professor of American history in 1941. He served as the university's official historian and wrote a three-volume history of the institution, the Tercentennial History of Harvard College and University, which was completed in 1936. Between 1922 and 1925 he was Harmsworth professor of American history at Oxford. He also was an accomplished sailor who retired from the navy in 1951 as a rear admiral. In preparing for his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies of Christopher Columbus and John Paul Jones, Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1941) and John Paul Jones: A Sailor's Biography (1952) he took himself out of the study and onto the high seas, where he traced the voyages of his subjects and "lived" their stories insofar as possible. When it came time for the U.S. Navy to select an author to write a history of its operations in World War II, Morison was the natural choice for the task. In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of U.S. naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander. The 15 volumes of his History of United States Naval Operations in World War II appeared between 1947 and 1962. Although he retired from Harvard in 1955, Morison continued his research and writing. A product of the Brahmin tradition, Morison wrote about Bostonians and other New Englanders and about life in early Massachusetts. He was an "American historian" in the fullest sense of the term. He also had a keen appreciation for the larger history of the nation and world, provincial is the last word one would use to describe Morison's writing.

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