LIVINGSTONES'S TRAVELS AND RESEARCHES IN SO UTH AFRICA

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Page 330 - ... witnessed in England. It had never been seen before by European eyes ; but scenes so lovely must have been gazed upon by angels in their flight.
Page 21 - ... that which seems to be felt by a mouse after the first shake of the cat. It caused a sort of dreaminess, in which there was no sense of pain nor feeling of terror, though quite conscious of all that was happening. It was like what patients partially under the influence of chloroform describe, who see all the operation, but feel not the knife. This singular condition was not the result of any mental process. The shake annihilated fear and allowed no sense of horror in looking round at the beast.
Page 21 - Creator for lessening the pain of death. Turning round to relieve myself of the weight, as he had one paw on the back of my head, I saw his eyes directed to Mebalwe, who was trying to shoot him at a distance of ten or fifteen yards.
Page 22 - ... moment the bullets he had received took effect, and he fell down dead. The whole was. the work of a few moments, and must have been his paroxysms of dying rage.
Page 49 - ... afternoon only a small portion remained for the children. This was a bitterly anxious night ; and next morning the less there was of water, the more thirsty the little rogues became. The idea of their perishing before our eyes was terrible. It would almost have been a relief to me to have been reproached with being the entire cause of the catastrophe ; but not one syllable of upbraiding was uttered by their mother, though the tearful eye told the agony within. In the afternoon of the fifth day,...
Page 373 - All authority hath been given unto me in heaven and on earth. Go ye therefore, and make disciples of all the nations...
Page 330 - In coming hither there was danger of being swept down by the streams which rushed along on each side of the island; but the river was now low, and we sailed where it is totally impossible to go when the water is high. But, though we had reached the island, and were within a few yards of the spot, a view from which would solve the whole problem, I believe that no one could perceive where the vast body of water went; it seemed to lose itself in the earth, the opposite lip of the fissure into which...
Page 331 - ... peered down into a large rent which had been made from bank to bank of the broad Zambesi, and saw that a stream of a thousand yards broad leaped down a hundred feet, and then became suddenly compressed into a space of fifteen or twenty yards. The entire falls are simply a crack made in a hard basaltic rock from the right to the left bank of the Zambesi, and then prolonged from the left bank away through thirty or forty miles of hills.
Page 50 - Its peculiar buzz, when once heard, can never be forgotten by the traveller whose means of locomotion are domestic animals, for it is well known that the bite of this poisonous insect is certain death to the ox , horse and dog. In this journey, though we were not aware of any great number having at any time lighted on our cattle, we lost forty-three fine oxen by its bite. We watched the animals carefully, and believe that not a score of flies were ever upon them. "A most remarkable feature in the...
Page 13 - In the glow of love which Christianity inspires, I soon resolved to devote my life to the alleviation of human misery.

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