Yodel-ay-ee-oooo: The Secret History of Yodeling Around the World

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Psychology Press, 2004 - Music - 342 pages
2 Reviews

In Joseph Conrad's tales, representations of women and of "feminine" generic forms like the romance are often present in fugitive ways. Conrad's use of allegorical feminine imagery, fleet or deferred introductions of female characters, and hybrid generic structures that combine features of "masculine" tales of adventure and intrigue and "feminine" dramas of love or domesticity are among the subjects of this literary study. Many of Conrad's critics have argued that Conrad's fictions are aesthetically flawed by the inclusion of women and love plots; thus Thomas Moser has questioned why Conrad did not "cut them out altogether." Yet a thematics of gender suffuses Conrad's narrative strategies. Even in tales that contain no significant female characters or obvious love plots, Conrad introduces elusive feminine presences, in relationships between men, as well as in men's relationships to their ship, the sea, a shore breeze, or even in the gendered embrace of death. This book investigates an identifiably feminine "point of view" which is present in fugitive ways throughout Conrad's canon. Conrad's narrative strategies are articulated through a language of sexual difference that provides the vocabulary and grammar for tales examining European class, racial, and gender paradigms to provide acute and, at times, equivocal investigations of femininity and difference.

  

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Yodel-ay-ee-ooo: the secret history of yodeling around the world

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Writing like the manic, gonzo son of Nick Tosches, Plantenga here crams into his text just about everything one would ever want to know and then some about yodeling and yodelers. A DJ and amateur ... Read full review

Review: Yodel-Ay-Ee-Oooo: The Secret History of Yodeling Around the World

User Review  - Catherine - Goodreads

I wanted to like it, but it was just too much information thrown together and I found myself skimming most of the book by the time I reached the third chapter. Good reference, but not a good read. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
9
III
29
IV
57
V
83
VI
111
VII
137
VIII
157
XI
241
XII
269
XIII
297
XIV
307
XV
311
XVI
313
XVII
321
XVIII
329

IX
185
X
213

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About the author (2004)

Bart Plantenga is a widely published author, having written journalism, fiction, and non-fiction. His writings have appeared in Reggae, Rasta Revolution: Jamaican Music from Ska to Dub , and he has contributed to many musical and pop culture journals, including the American Music Research Center Journal. He lives in Amsterdam.

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