Manliness

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C. J. Ridge, 1875 - 136 pages
 

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Contents

I
1
II
10
III
26
V
43
VI
61
VII
91
VIII
119

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Page 128 - To have done, is to hang Quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail In monumental mockery. Take the instant way For honour travels in a strait so narrow, W'here one but goes abreast: keep then the path; For emulation hath a thousand sons, That one by one pursue: If you give way...
Page 24 - Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition : By that sin fell the angels; how can man, then, The image of his Maker, hope to win by it ? Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee ; Corruption wins not more than honesty.
Page 123 - The longer I live, the more I am certain that the great difference between men, between the feeble and the powerful, the great and the insignificant, is energy — invincible determination — a purpose once fixed, and then death or victory ! That quality will do anything that can be done in this world ; and no talents, no circumstances, no opportunities, will make a twolegged creature a man without it.
Page 64 - Heaven-born, the Soul a heaven-ward course must hold ; Beyond the visible world she soars to seek (For what delights the sense is false and weak) Ideal Form, the universal mould. The wise man, I affirm, can find no rest In that which perishes : nor will he lend His heart to aught which doth on time depend. "Tis sense, unbridled will, and not true love, That kills the soul: love betters what is best, Even here below, but more in Heaven above.
Page 18 - O Lord, thy word is settled in heaven. Thy faithfulness is unto all generations : thou hast established the earth, and it abideth. They continue this day according to thine ordinances: for all are thy servants.
Page 76 - Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings ; he shall not stand before mean men...
Page 67 - I saw you last ; by no means, replied the sculptor, I have retouched this part, and polished that; I have softened this feature, and brought out this muscle ; I have given more expression to this lip and more energy to this limb : Well, well, said his friend, but all these are trifles ; it may be so, replied Angelo, but recollect that trifles make perfection, and that perfection is no trifle.
Page 22 - Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders, This many summers in a sea of glory ; But far beyond my depth : my high-blown pride At length broke under me ; and now has left me, Weary, and old with service, to the mercy Of a rude stream, that must for ever hide me. Vain pomp, and glory of this world, I hate ye ; I feel my heart new open'd : O, how wretched Is that poor man, that hangs on princes...
Page 18 - In them hath he set a tabernacle for the sun, Which is as a bridegroom coming out of his chamber, and rejoiceth as a strong man to run a race.
Page 120 - WHAT are we set on earth for ? Say, to toil; Nor seek to leave thy tending of the vines For all the heat o' the day, till it declines, And death's mild curfew shall from work assoil. God did anoint thee with his odorous oil, To wrestle, not to reign; and he assigns All thy tears over, like pure crystallines, For younger fellow-workers of the soil To wear for amulets. So others shall Take patience...

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