The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: In Verse and Prose, Volume 10

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J. Johnson, 1806
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Contents

To the Same
174
To the Same
175
To the Same
178
To the Same
180
LETTERS to WILLIAM FORTESCUE
185
LET
188
Letter Pag I Mr Pope to William Fortescue Esq 187 II To the Same at his House in Bellyard near LincolnsInn London
189
To the Same at Fallowpit near Totnes Devon
190
To the Same
192
To the Same
193
To the Same at his House in Bellyard LincolnsInn ibid
194
To the Same
195
To the Same
196
To the Hon Mr Baron Fortescue in Bell yard LincolnsInn
197
To William Fortescue Esq
198
To the Same
199
To William Fortescue Esq Member of Parliament at his House in Bellyard Lincolnsinnfields ibid
200
To the Same
201
To the Same ibid XVI To the Same
202
To the Same
204
To the Same ibid XX To the Same in Toms Coffeehouse De vereuxcourt Temple
206
To the Same at his House in Bellyard
207
To the Same
208
To the Same at Fallapit near Totnes Devon
212
To the Same at his House in Bellyard LincolnsInn
214
To the Same
215
To the Same at his Chambers in Har courtbuildings Inner Temple
216
To the Same in Bellyard LincolnsInn
217
To the Same
218
To the Same
219
To the Same
220
To the Same
221
XXXVL To the Same
222
To the Same at Fallapit near Totnes Devon
223
To the Same in Bellyard LincolnsInn
225
To the Same ibid XL To the Same
226
To the Same
227
To the Same
228
To the Same
229
To the Same ibid XLV To the Same 231
231
To the Same 233 XLVII To the Same
233
To the Same
234
To the Same at the Vineyard Richmond
235
To the Same
239
L
263
Three Hours after Marriage a Comedy 243 Concluding Observations on the Poetic Cha
383
II
416
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Page 163 - But soft recesses for th' uneasy mind, To sigh unheard in, to the passing wind ! So the struck deer, in some sequester'd part, Lies down to die (the arrow in his heart) ; There hid in shades, and wasting day by day, Inly he bleeds, and pants his soul away.
Page 168 - Tis but the funeral of the former year. Let joy or ease, let affluence or content, And the gay conscience of a life well spent, Calm every thought, inspirit every grace, Glow in thy heart, and smile upon thy face. Let day improve on day, and year on year, Without a pain, a trouble, or a fear...
Page 39 - Downs, eat heartily, talk tender sentiments with Lord B., or draw plans for houses and gardens, open avenues, cut glades, plant firs, contrive water-works, all very fine and beautiful in our own imagination. At night we play at commerce, and play pretty high : I do more, I...
Page 131 - This confinement, together with the mourning,* has enabled me to be very easy in my chair-hire : for a dyed black gown and a scoured white one have done my business very well; and they are now just fit for Petersham, where we talk of going in three weeks : and I am not without hopes I shall have the same squire that I had last year.
Page 51 - He has with him, day after day, not only all his relations, but every creature of the town of Southampton that pleases. He lies on his couch and receives them, though he says little. When his pains come, he desires them to walk out, but invites them to stay and dine or sup, &c.
Page 131 - I shall endeavour to behave myself mighty well, that I may keep my old ones. As a proof that I continue to be well received at court, I will tell you where the royal family design to pass their summer : two months at Richmond lodge, the same time at Hampton court, and six weeks at Windsor. Mrs. Howard is well, and happier than ever you saw her; for her whole affair with her husband is ended to her satisfaction.
Page 49 - ... friend to enjoy after him ; that he had one care more, when he went into France, which was, to give a true account to posterity of some parts of history in Queen Anne's reign, which Burnet had scandalously...
Page 128 - ... inviting us in a whole season to a cow-heel at home. I wish you would bring Mr. Pope over with you when you come, but we will leave Mr. Gay to his Beggars and his Operas till he is able to pay his club. How will you pass this summer, for want of a squire to Ham-Common and Walpole's Lodge ; for as to Richmond Lodge and Marble-hill, they are abandoned as much as Sir Spencer Compton : and Mr.
Page 128 - Kensington where you will be near the court, and out of his jurisdiction ; where you will be teazed with no lectures of gravity and morality, and where you will have no other trouble than to get into the mercer's books, and take up a hundred pounds of your principal for quadrille. Monstrous, indeed, that a fine lady, in the prime of life and gaiety, must take up with an antiquated Dean, an old gentlewoman of fourscore, and a sickly poet. I will stand by my dear Patty against the world, if Teresa...
Page 130 - I cannot say I have a great inclination to write to you, for I have no great vanity that way, at least not enough to support me above the fear of writing ill: but I would fain have you know how truly well I wish you. I am sorry to hear no good account of your health; mine has been, since Christmas (at which time I had my fever and rash) neither well, nor ill enough...

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