Pragmatism and the Political Economy of Cultural Revolution, 1850-1940

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 1997 - Business & Economics - 392 pages
The rise of corporate capitalism was a cultural revolution as well as an economic event, according to James Livingston. That revolution resides, he argues, in the fundamental reconstruction of selfhood, or subjectivity, that attends the advent of an "age
 

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Contents

The Political Economy of Consumer Culture
1
Making Use of Marx
3
Social Origins of Economic Growth
13
Composition of Capital Decomposition of Capitalism
21
Consumer Goods and Continental Industrialization 18501900
24
The Politics of Continental Industrialization
31
Production and Consumption as Political Culture
41
Mass Consumption and Marginalist Economics
49
The Uses of Historicism
154
Transition Questions William James at the Origin of Our Own Time
158
Toward the Limits of Relations of Production
172
Money Questions and Moral Equivalents in the Future Tense
181
John Deweys Sympathy for the Devil
187
Thoughts and Things in Emersonian Perspective
199
Pragmatism Accredited
208
Modern Subjectivity and Moral Philosophy
214

Between Consumers and Corporations
57
Advent of the Age of Surplus
66
The Priority of Class and the Production of Irony
77
Corporate Capitalism and Consumer Culture 18901940
84
The Human Element
98
The Limits of Consumer Culture
109
Naturalism Pragmatism and the Reconstruction of Subjectivity 18901930
119
Ghost in the Narrative Machine
123
The Price of Historiographical Progress
127
The Subject of Naturalism
132
Sister Carrie as Romance
137
The Political Economy of the Self
146
The Politics of the Poetry of the Self
149
The Romantic Acquiescence Pragmatism and the Young Intellectuals
225
Mumford Bergson Melville
231
Technics and Personality
240
Poiesis and Politics
247
The Past and the Presence of the Postmodern in Pragmatism
256
Does Consciousness Exist?
263
Pragmatism as a Postrepublican Frame of Acceptance
273
Rorty Relativism and the Problem of History
279
Transitive Subjects
289
Notes
295
Index
389
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About the author (1997)

James Livingston, professor of history at Rutgers University, is author of Origins of the Federal Reserve System: Money, Class, and Corporate Capitalism, 1890-1913.

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