We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People

Front Cover
"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 2004 - Computers - 299 pages
1 Review

Grassroots journalists are dismantling Big Media's monopoly on the news, transforming it from a lecture to a conversation. Not content to accept the news as reported, these readers-turned-reporters are publishing in real time to a worldwide audience via the Internet. The impact of their work is just beginning to be felt by professional journalists and the newsmakers they cover. In We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People, nationally known business and technology columnist Dan Gillmor tells the story of this emerging phenomenon, and sheds light on this deep shift in how we make and consume the news.We the Media is essential reading for all participants in the news cycle:

  • Consumers learn how they can become producers of the news. Gillmor lays out the tools of the grassroots journalist's trade, including personal Web journals (called weblogs or blogs), Internet chat groups, email, and cell phones. He also illustrates how, in this age of media consolidation and diminished reporting, to roll your own news, drawing from the array of sources available online and even over the phone.
  • Newsmakers politicians, business executives, celebrities get a wake-up call. The control that newsmakers enjoyed in the top-down world of Big Media is seriously undermined in the Internet Age. Gillmor shows newsmakers how to successfully play by the new rules and shift from control to engagement.
  • Journalists discover that the new grassroots journalism presents opportunity as well as challenge to their profession. One of the first mainstream journalists to have a blog, Gillmor says, "My readers know more than I do, and that's a good thing." In We the Media, he makes the case to his colleagues that, in the face of a plethora of Internet-fueled news vehicles, they must change or become irrelevant.
At its core, We the Media is a book about people. People like Glenn Reynolds, a law professor whose blog postings on the intersection of technology and liberty garnered him enough readers and influence that he became a source for professional journalists. Or Ben Chandler, whose upset Congressional victory was fueled by contributions that came in response to ads on a handful of political blogs. Or Iraqi blogger Zayed, whose Healing Irag blog (healingiraq.blogspot.com) scooped Big Media. Or acridrabbit, who inspired an online community to become investigative reporters and discover that the dying Kaycee Nichols sad tale was a hoax. Give the people tools to make the news, We the Media asserts, and they will.Journalism in the 21st century will be fundamentally different from the Big Media that prevails today. We the Media casts light on the future of journalism, and invites us all to be part of it.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Television, print, radio, etc. has long been the bastion of traditional media. That is, until the Internet became the tool of the people, allowing us to participate in content creation in ways never before seen. The masses have become less content in being subscribers to traditional media outlets; the Internet has become one of the major tools through which citizens have taken the idea of Journalist off its high pedestal and is helping us to reshape the very nature of who makes content and why it is important.
Dan Gillmor is a journalist of both traditional and new media, and his "Wethe Media" is an excellent study into how citizen's media is of growing importance in today's society. Gillmor uses a variety of relatively recent cases, such as the Howard Dean candidacy, and looks closely at how these instances are proving that citizens media is maturing rapidly and its tools will become the new face of new media.
An excellent, easy to read bit of work, Gillmor has done a stellar job in the tradition of Reingold, Lessig and others in exploring and supporting the common man in the face of tradition.
 

Contents

From Tom Paine to Blogs and Beyond i
15
The ReadWrite Web
23
The Gates Come Down
44
Newsmakers Turn the Tables
66
The Consent of the Governed
88
Professional Journalists Join the Conversation
110
The Former Audience Joins the Party
136
Next Steps
158
Trolls Spin and the Boundaries of Trust
174
Here Come the Judges and Lawyers
191
The Empires Strike Back
209
i2 Making Our Own News
236
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Dan Gillmor is founder of Grassroots Media Inc., a project aimed at enabling grassroots journalism and expanding its reach. The company's first launch is Bayosphere.com, a site "of, by and for the Bay Area." Gillmor is is author of We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People (O'Reilly Media, 2004), a book that explains the rise of citizens' media and why it matters.From 1994-2004, Gillmor was a columnist at the San Jose Mercury News, Silicon Valley's daily newspaper, and wrote a weblog for SiliconValley.com. He joined the Mercury News after six years with the Detroit Free Press. Before that, he was with the Kansas City Times and several newspapers in Vermont. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Vermont, Gillmor received a Herbert Davenport fellowship in 1982 for economics and business reporting at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. During the 1986-87 academic year he was a journalism fellow at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where he studied history, political theory and economics. He has won or shared in several regional and national journalism awards. Before becoming a journalist he played music professionally for seven years.

Bibliographic information