Disruptive Power: Catholic Women, Miracles, and Politics in Modern Germany, 1918-1965

Front Cover
University of Toronto Press, Nov 23, 2018 - History - 344 pages

Disruptive Power examines a surprising revival of faith in Catholic miracles in Germany from the 1920s to the 1960s. The book follows the dramatic stigmata of Therese Neumann of Konnersreuth and her powerful circle of followers that included theologians, Cardinals, politicians, journalists, monarchists, anti-fascists, and everyday pilgrims. Disruptive Power explores how this and other similar groups negotiated the precariousness of the Weimar Republic, the repression of the Third Reich, and the dynamic early years of the Federal Republic.

Analyzing a network of rebellious traditionalists, O’Sullivan illustrates the divisions that characterized the German Catholic minority as they endured the tumultuous era of the world wars. Analyzing material from archives in Germany and the United States, Michael E. O’Sullivan investigates the unsanctioned but very popular visions in several rural towns after World War II, providing micro-histories that illuminate the impact of mystical faith on religiosity, politics, and gender norms.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
3
Bloody Images and Miraculous Cures
20
2 The Rise of Therese Neumann of Konnersreuth during the Weimar Republic
53
The Struggle over Konnersreuth and the Downfall of Political Catholicism
77
Gender and Sex in Konnersreuth
115
Catholic Miracles under the Third Reich
140
Marian Apparitions during the Early Federal Republic
174
7 Therese Neumann between Catholic Traditionalism Cold War and Economic Miracle
211
Conclusion
243
Notes
255
Bibliography
293
Index
311
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2018)

Michael E. O’Sullivan is an associate professor in the Department of History at Marist College.

Bibliographic information