The Scarlet Letter

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
151 Reviews
"The Scarlet Letter" is the story of Hester Prynne a young attractive woman who has been convicted of the crime of adultery and has been sentenced to wear a scarlet letter "A" sewn to her dress. The novel, which is set in middle 17th century Boston, is a vivid picture of the archaic social beliefs and customs that were indicative of early colonial American life. It is a time in which adultery was not only considered immoral but was a crime, people believed in witches, and extreme puritanical beliefs ruled everyday life. Hawthorne's narrative is a haunting portrait of days long past.
 

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5 stars
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4 stars
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3 stars
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2 stars
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its a good book, but it is very hard to read - LibraryThing
The prose is obtuse and the imagery laborious at best. - LibraryThing
Hawthorne has no excuse for such poor writing. - LibraryThing
Skip the intro "custom house" part, though. - LibraryThing

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - GrlIntrrptdRdng - LibraryThing

I always wondered why I didn't read this school in high school because it is a classic, but I am so thankful that we didn't. I had the hardest time getting interested in The Scarlet Letter. I was ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KR_Patterson - LibraryThing

I felt the need to rate this at least 3 stars simply because the writing was so good. In fact, the only reason I finished it was because I loved the use of creative language. But I just don't have the ... Read full review

All 24 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

EDITORS NOTE p
5
INTRODUCTORY THE CUSTOMHOUSE p
7
THE PRISONDOOR p
29
THE RECOGNITION p
35
THE INTERVIEW p
40
HESTER AT HER NEEDLE p
43
PEARL p
48
THE GOVERNORS HALL p
54
ANOTHER VIEW OF HESTER p
83
HESTER AND THE PHYSICIAN p
87
HESTER AND PEARL p
90
A FOREST WALK p
94
THE PASTOR AND HIS PARISHIONER p
97
A FLOOD OF SUNSHINE p
102
THE CHILD AT THE BROOKSIDE p
106
THE MINISTER IN A MAZE p
110

THE ELFCHILD AND THE MINISTER p
57
THE LEECH p
62
THE LEECH AND HIS PATIENT p
68
THE INTERIOR OF A HEART p
73
THE MINISTERS VIGIL p
77
THE NEW ENGLAND HOLIDAY p
115
THE PROCESSION p
120
THE REVELATION OF THE SCARLET LETTER p
126
CONCLUSION p
130
Copyright

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Page 11 - It is no matter that the place is joyless for him: that he is weary of the old wooden houses, the mud and dust, the dead level of site and sentiment, the chill east wind, and the...
Page 9 - It is now nearly two centuries and a quarter since the original Briton, the earliest emigrant of my name, made his appearance in the wild and forestbordered settlement, which has since become a city.
Page 9 - This old town of Salem - my native place, though I have dwelt much away from it both in boyhood and maturer years - possesses, or did possess, a hold on my affection, the force of which I have never realized during my seasons of actual residence here. Indeed, so far as its physical aspect is concerned, with its flat, unvaried surface, covered chiefly with wooden houses, few or none of which pretend to architectural beauty...

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About the author (2004)

Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts. When he was four years old, his father died. Years later, with financial help from his maternal relatives who recognized his literary talent, Hawthorne was able to enroll in Bowdoin College. Among his classmates were the important literary and political figures Horatio Bridge, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Franklin Pierce. These friends supplied Hawthorne with employment during the early years after graduation while Hawthorne was still establishing himself as a legitimate author. Hawthorne's first novel, Fanshawe, which he self-published in 1828, wasn't quite the success that he had hoped it would be. Not willing to give up, he began writing stories for Twice-Told Tales. These stories established Hawthorne as a leading writer. In 1842, Hawthorne moved to Concord, Massachusetts, where he wrote a number of tales, including "Rappaccini's Daughter" and "Young Goodman Brown," that were later published as Mosses from an Old Manse. The overall theme of Hawthorne's novels was a deep concern with ethical problems of sin, punishment, and atonement. No one novel demonstrated that more vividly than The Scarlet Letter. This tale about the adulterous Puritan Hester Prynne is regarded as Hawthorne's best work and is a classic of American literature. Other famous novels written by Hawthorne include The House of Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance. In 1852, Hawthorne wrote a campaign biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce. After Pierce was elected as President of the United States, he rewarded Hawthorne with the Consulship at Liverpool, England. Hawthorne died in his sleep on May 19, 1864, while on a trip with Franklin Pierce.

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