Revolution and Rebellion: State and Society in England in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 30, 1986 - History - 182 pages
This iconoclastic and satirical book provides a radical reconstruction of the recent historiography of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It creates an alliance between those revisionist historians who have rewritten the received account of the origins of the English Civil War and those historians who have been rethinking the Hanoverian era. Revolution and Rebellion is thus a companion volume to the author's English Society 1688-1832. The book counters the Marxist interpretation of the 1640s and the 'English Revolution' by developing our new understanding of the non-revolutionary nature of the world after 1660: it challenges the appropriateness of 'revolution' as a description of events like those of 1688, 1715, 1745, the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution or the Reform Bill, drawing attention instead to the idea of 'rebellion'. This is the first book so to link English history in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and it will be required reading for students and teachers of both eras.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
A DISCOURSE ON METHOD
6
SOCIAL CHANGE EXPLANATIONS
24
THE CASE OF THE PROVINCES
45
THE MONARCHY AND PARLIAMENT
68
POLITICAL IDEOLOGY
92
PARTY STRUCTURE AND THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
120
Conclusion
164
Newmans definition of liberalism
172
The recent debate on Jacobitism after 1714
174
Index
178
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