The Spa

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Grove Press, 2009 - Fiction - 329 pages
2 Reviews
Fay Weldon is renowned for her biting humor and devilish prose. In her latest novel, The Spa, Weldon offers a glimpse of the despairs and dalliances of a set of high-powered women who have burned paths through--and sometimes been burned by--their worlds and the men in them. It is the week between Christmas and New Year's and ten high-achieving ladies are gathered at the expensive Castle Spa seeking to rejuvenate themselves with Botox, aromatherapy, and all-around pampering. They lounge in the Jacuzzi, sipping champagne, and telling each other the story of their lives, starting with the trophy wife's tale of her spell in a Greek prison; the brain surgeon's tale of twins and mistaken identity; the judge's tale of a sex change that allowed him to experience the pleasures of the bedroom from both male and female perspectives. The manicurist, the public speaker, the journalist, the company director, the ex-vicar's wife, and the screenwriter all share their stories, ending with the stepmother's tale, a reversal of Cinderella's fate, with the stepmother as the victim. Sparkling, witty, always sharp-tongued, and occasionally libidinous, The Spa is a darkly funny sketch of a group of women who, despite prejudice, imprisonment, domestic catastrophes, and romantic debacles, have risen to the top of their respective worlds.
 

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User Review  - eliseh - LibraryThing

Weldon, as always, produces sparkling dialogue suffused with wit and mischief Ten high achieving ladies are gathered together in the week between Christmas and the New Year, at the expensive Castle ... Read full review

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User Review  - hammockqueen - LibraryThing

women stuck in spa that is understaffed so they tell one another their stories. I just didn't find the women believeable or interesting. Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Fay Weldon was born in Worcester, England on September 22, 1931. She read economics and psychology at the University of St. Andrews. She worked as a propaganda writer for the British Foreign Office and then as an advertising copywriter for various firms in London before making writing a full-time career. Her work includes over twenty novels, five collections of short stories, several children's books, non-fiction books, and a number of plays written for television, radio and the stage. Her collections of short stories include Mischief and Nothing to Wear and Nowhere to Hide. She wrote a memoir entitled Auto Da Fay and non-fiction book entitled What Makes Women Happy. She wrote the pilot episode for the television series Upstairs Downstairs. Her first novel, The Fat Woman's Joke, was published in 1967. Her other novels include Praxis, The Life and Loves of a She-Devil, Puffball, Rhode Island Blues, Mantrapped, She May Not Leave, The Spa Decameron, Habits of the House, Long Live the King, and The New Countess. Wicked Women won the PEN/Macmillan Silver Pen Award. She was awarded a CBE in 2001.

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