The Promised Land

Front Cover
Penguin, 1997 - Social Science - 305 pages
2 Reviews
Interweaving introspection with political commentaries, biography with history, The Promised Land (1912) brings to life the transformation of an East European Jewish immigrant into an American citizen. Mary Antin recounts "the process of uprooting, transportation, replanting, acclimitization, and development that took place in my own soul," and reveals the impact of a new culture and new standards of behavior on her family. A feeling of divisions—between Russia and America, Jews and Gentiles, Yiddish and English—ever-present in her narrative, is balanced by insights, amusing and serious, into ways to overcome them. In telling the story of one person, The Promised Land illuminates the lives of hundreds of thousands.

This Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics edition includes eighteen black-and-white photographs from the book's first edition and reprints for the first time Antin's essay "How I wrote The Promised Land."

 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - amelish - LibraryThing

We get it, you were precocious and lucky. And grew up to be earnest. Mary Antin's memoir about early childhood in a Russian Jewish community, emigrating to Boston (?) with her family, and the process ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - whitewavedarling - LibraryThing

This is a wonderful and complicated story of Antin's childhood as she lives first in Russia and then in America. It is a picture of immigration, the search for what is the American dream however it is ... Read full review

Contents

VIII
5
IX
26
X
36
XI
50
XII
65
XIII
90
XIV
110
XV
130
XXI
207
XXII
217
XXIII
224
XXIV
237
XXV
251
XXVI
263
XXVII
281
XXVIII
287

XVI
143
XVII
163
XVIII
175
XIX
190
XX
198
XXIX
289
XXX
295
XXXI
299
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xi - After all everybody, that is, everybody who writes is interested in living inside themselves in order to tell what is inside themselves. That is why writers have to have two countries, the one where they belong and the one in which they live really. The second one is romantic, it is separate from themselves, it is not real but it is really there.
Page xxxix - It is not the Jew who sticks proudly to the faith of his fathers and boasts of that venerable culture of his who is dangerous to America, but the Jew who has lost the Jewish fire and become a mere elementary, grasping animal.
Page 3 - I can never forget, for I bear the scars. But I want to forget — sometimes I long to forget. I think I have thoroughly assimilated my past — I have done its bidding — I want now to be of to-day. It is painful to be consciously of two worlds. The Wandering Jew in me seeks forgetfulness.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information