Nicomachean Ethics: Easyread Comfort Edition

Front Cover
Booksurge Llc, Oct 1, 2006 - Philosophy - 336 pages
12 Reviews
"Nicomachean Ethics" is considered as one of the greatest work by Aristotle. In this book he argues that virtue is more significant for human beings than pride, pleasure and happiness. According to him virtue can be described in two ways, moral virtue and intellectual virtue. A balanced combination of both is the key to an ideal life. Thought-provoking!

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Review: The Nicomachean Ethics

User Review  - Andrew - Goodreads

The introduction goes through the word 'ethics' and how Aristotle meant something different - more about character. Also by happiness he meant something different. There exists an indeterminancy of ... Read full review

Review: The Nicomachean Ethics

User Review  - Frank Della Torre - Goodreads

The Nicomachean Ethics represents Aristotle's search for how to live the virtuous life. The treatise doesn't search for an abstract virtue in itself (like Plato), but rather for how to achieve virtue ... Read full review

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References to this book

Morality and the Emotions
Justin Oakley
No preview available - 1993
Morality and the Emotions
Justin Oakley
No preview available - 1993
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About the author (2006)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

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