Letters of Colonel Sir Augustus Simon Frazer, K.C.B. commanding the Royal horse artillery in the army under Wellington: Written during the peninsular and Waterloo campaigns

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Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, & Roberts, 1859 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814 - 609 pages
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Contents

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Page 303 - According to all the information which the commander of the forces has received, outrages of all descriptions were committed by the troops, in presence even of their officers, who took no pains whatever to prevent them.
Page 303 - The commander of the forces is anxious to draw the attention of the officers of the army to the difference of the situation in which they have been hitherto among the peoples of Portugal and Spain, and that in which they may hereafter find themselves among those of the frontiers of France.
Page 303 - France. 2. Every military precaution must henceforward be used to obtain intelligence and to prevent surprise. General and superior officers at the head of detached corps will take care to keep up a constant and regular communication with the corps upon their right and left, and with their rear ; and the soldiers and their followers must be prevented from wandering to a distance from their camps and cantonments on any account whatever.
Page 304 - The Officers and soldiers of the army must recollect that their nations are at war with France solely because the Ruler of the French nation will not allow them to be at peace, and is desirous of forcing them to submit to his yoke...
Page 546 - I am now so tired that I can hardly hold my pen. We have gained a glorious victory, and against Napoleon himself. I know not yet the amount of killed, wounded, or prisoners, but all must be great. Never was there a more bloody affair, never so hot a fire. Bonaparte put in practice every device of war. He tried us with artillery, with cavalry, and last of all with infantry. The efforts of each were gigantic, but the admirable talents of our Duke, seconded by such troops as he commands, baffled every...
Page 304 - ... 5. To revenge this conduct on the peaceable inhabitants of France would be unmanly and unworthy of the nations to whom the Commander of the Forces now addresses himself, and at all events would be the occasion of similar and worse evils to the army at large than those which the enemy's army have suffered in the Peninsula, and would eventually prove highly injurious to the public interests.
Page 552 - Had the troops continued with light guns, I do not hesitate to say the day had been lost. The earlier hours of the battle were chiefly affairs of artillery; but kept down by the admirable and steadily-continued fire of our guns, the enemy's infantry could not come on en masse, and his cavalry, though bold, impetuous and daring, was forced to try the flanks rather than the front of our position.'23 Bull's troop was, as has been said, equipped with the heavy type of 5 '/2 -inch howitzer.
Page 303 - The Commander of the Forces has already determined that some Officers, so grossly negligent of their duty, shall be sent to England, that their names may be brought under the attention of the Prince Regent, and that His Royal Highness may give such directions respecting them as he may think proper; as the Commander of the Forces is determined not to command Officers who will not obey his orders.
Page 547 - After seven hours' cannonading, the French cavalry made some of the boldest charges I ever saw: they sounded the whole extent of our line, which was thrown into squares. Never did cavalry behave so nobly, or was received by infantry so firmly.
Page 304 - Officers and soldiers must recollect, that their nations are at war with France solely because the ruler of the French nation will not allow them to be at peace, and is desirous of forcing them to submit to his yoke; and they must not forget, that the worst of the evils suffered by the enemy, in his profligate invasion of Spain and Portugal, have been occasioned by the irregularities of his soldiers, and their cruelties, authorised and encouraged by their chiefs, towards the unfortunate and peaceful...

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