Electrochemistry

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Wiley, Sep 10, 1998 - Science - 423 pages
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With the advent of materials science and nanotechnology, electrochemistry is becoming increasingly important and at the same time more interdisciplinary. This textbook provides a concise introduction to the fundamental principles of modern electrochemistry.

The authors are renowned scientists and experienced textbook authors, making the book scientifically up to date and thorough, but still didactically skillful and lucid. Whether you teach courses in electrochemistry or you still prepare for your exam ... This book will be the one to refer to!

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About the author (1998)

Carl H. Hamann: Following his studies in mathematics, physics, biology and economics in Hamburg and Bonn, graduating in 1966 as a physicist, Carl H. Hamann gained his doctorate in 1970, becoming Professor for Applied Physical Chemistry at the University of Oldenburg in 1975. He has since concentrated mainly on fuel cells, electrochemical metrology, passage and adsorption kinetics, turbulent flows, the thermodynamics of irreversible systems, preparative electroorganic chemistry and technical electrochemistry. Professor Hamann has thus far published some 80 articles in journals and books.

Wolf Vielstich: As Heinz Gerischer's first student, in G?ngen in 1952/53, Wolf Vielstich was concerned with developing a fast Potentiostaten while determining exchange current densities. Upon starting work at the Institute for Physical Chemistry, Bonn University, in 1960 he demonstrated that, apart from mercury, reproducible cyclic voltamograms, such as for the oxidation of hydrogen and methanol, are contained in solid electrodes, including Pt, Ir, Rh, Au and Pd. There then followed experiments with methanol/air and NiMH cells, among others. He was always interested in developing novel methods, such as the rotating ring electrode, on-line MS (DEMS), in-situ FTIRS and UHV analysis of adsorbants. Between 1986 and 1993, Wolf Vielstich was the Coordinator of the first European project to develop a DMFC, and in 1998 he was awarded the Faraday Medal by the Royal Chemical Society. Since 1999 he has been working as a guest of the Universidade de Sao Paulo, and edited Wiley's Handbook of Fuel Cells (2003).

Professor Hamnett graduated from the University of Oxford with a BA (Chemistry) in 1970 and aD.Phil. (Chemistry) in 1973. He has held research and academic positions at the University of British Columbia, Canada, and at Oxford and Newcastle Universities, England, before his appointment in January 2001 as Principal and Vice-chancellor of the University of Strathclyde. He has nearly 200 publications in books and scientific journals, covering areas of spectroscopy, quantum theory and electrochemistry. His primary academic interests in recent years include the development and utilisation of spectro-electrochemical techniques in electrochemistry, and the development of improved fuel cells and solar-energy conversion devices.

Wolf Vielstich started research work on Fuel Fells and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis at Ruhrchemie / Oberhausen. Working in the field of Fundamental and Applied Electrochemistry at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of Bonn University, he completed his Habilitation in Physical Chemistry in 1962. From 1965 he was a professor and director at the Bonn Institute. His special interest was new experimental methods like Rotating Ring Electrodes, online MS, Insitu IR and UHV-analysis of electrode surfaces, as well as to Batteries and Fuel Cells. His work in Electrochemistry has resulted in more than 250 publications, over 10 patents, books on Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Kinetics, and textbooks on Electrochemistry. From 1986 to 1993, Professor Vielstich was co-ordinator of the first European project on the DMFC and in 1998 he received the Faraday Medal of the Royal Chemical Society, UK.
Arnold Lamm has been involved in industrial research in this field for over 7 years, firstly at the DaimlerBenz research centre in Ulm, Germany, where his projects included methanol-reforming, methanolcatalysis, reactor engineering, thermodynamic calculations and system engineering of PEMFC-systems based on methanol. He also worked on the development of a simulation program as a basis for the first methanol-reformer car Necar III. He also worked as Project leader (PEMFC-power station) at the former AEG Energietechnik T&D, Frankfurt, Germany in a project with Ballard Generation Systems. Since 1997 Dr Lamm has been Senior manager for fuel cell systems at the central research of DaimlerChrysler, where his work has included a the demonstration of the worldwide first DMFC-vehicle, development of gasoline/dieselfuel processors for stationary and mobile applications and development of advanced components for FC-propulsion systems (e.g. air-supply). He holds over 40 patents on the fuel cell field.
Hubert A. Gasteiger has spent 9 years in academic research in fundamental electrocatalysis and fuel cell-related gas-phase catalysis, plus 5 years of industrial research and development in fuel cell components development. Dr Gasteiger was involved in the stack and stack-component design for GM / Opel's H2-powered Fuel Cell Cars (H1, H2, and H3), and since 1998 has been manager in stack components (membranes, catalysts, bipolar plate materials and coatings, MEAs) development at GM/Opel's Global Alternative Propulsion Center in Mainz-Kastel, Germany, and at GM's Fuel Cell Activities facility in Honeoye Falls, New York, USA. Dr Gasteiger has published 45 publications in refereed journals and co-chaired the 2000 Gordon Research Conference on Fuel Cells.

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