An Historical Address Delivered Before the Massachusetts Agricultural College: On the Occasion of Graduating Its First Class, July 19, 1871

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Wright & Potter, printers, 1871 - Agriculture - 37 pages
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Page 19 - Act, to the endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislature of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life.
Page 33 - He who knows the most, he who knows what sweets and virtues are in the ground, the waters, the plants, the heavens, and how to come at these enchantments, is the rich and royal man.
Page 16 - Resolved, That, inasmuch as agriculture is the chief occupation of her citizens, the Commonwealth, in the organization of its government, should be provided with a department of agriculture, with otflces commensurate with the importance of the duties to be discharged, of the abilities to be required, and of the labors to be performed.
Page 15 - ... means in promoting the cause of agricultural education, which is so essential to the prosperity of farmers and to the welfare of communities, it becomes at once the duty and policy of the Commonwealth to establish and maintain such institutions for the benefit of all its inhabitants. Resolved, 5. That the several plans for an agricultural school, recently reported by the board of commissioners appointed for that purpose, are worthy the profound consideration of the people of Massachusetts, and...
Page 21 - ... the grant, for the purpose of securing the confidence of the agricultural community, and of conducting such a scheme as will operate for the benefit of those engaged in this business. Resolved, That, in the opinion of this Board, the interests of the State and intentions of Congress require that the grant should be principally devoted to the establishment of an educational institution for the practical and scientific study of agriculture and for the instruction of youths who intend to follow...
Page 29 - Let our young men, instead of rushing to the crowded marts of business, to become highly civilized and distinguished in life, resort to our agricultural colleges and learn that the highest triumph of civilization is the conquest of mind over matter ; the dominion of man over nature, improving, adorning and elevating her to the noblest purposes of creation.
Page 13 - It is also to be hoped that the cause of agricultural education, now about to receive the consideration of the Legislature, will not be overlooked in the deliberations of this body; and, if it be the opinion of this convention that agriculture may be promoted by the application of science, that such a sentiment may be expressed in terms so explicit as not to be misunderstood, and that the aid of government may be solicited for this purpose.
Page 19 - War absorbed public attention. In 1858 Hon. Justin S. Morrill, representative from Vermont, submitted a bill to Congress donating a portion of the public lands for the endowment of a college in each state, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts. This bill, after prolonged discussion for two sessions, passed both houses of Congress but was vetoed by President James Buchanan.
Page 12 - The commissioners close their report by offering their recommendations on the following conditions : — 1. To carry out the foregoing views, the commissioners recommend the appropriation by the Legislature of twenty thousand dollars, for the purpose of establishing a Central Agricultural College, with a Model and Experimental Farm; said institution to be open to all classes of the Commonwealth, and in the government of which the State shall be interested so far as may be deemed expedient...
Page 19 - Chickasaws for said lands, taking into consideration the circumstances and conditions under which they were used, and the final disposition thereof. This bill passed both houses of Congress and was sent to the President and disapproved by him on February 18, 1931, upon the ground that to permit the institution of a suit, as provided by the bill, would violate the doctrine of res adjudieata (S. Doc. 280, 71st Cong.', 3d sess.). 9. With the elimination of that portion of the "Leased District...

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